2021 WTA Tour
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2021 WTA Tour
2021 WTA Tour
Ash Barty January 2019.jpg
Ashleigh Barty won her second major singles title at Wimbledon, finished the year as the world No. 1 player for the third consecutive year, and was awarded Player of the Year. She also won four other titles, at Miami, Cincinnati, Stuttgart, and the Yarra Valley Classic.
Details
Duration4 January - 17 November 2021
Edition51st
Categories
Achievements (singles)
Most tournament titlesAustralia Ashleigh Barty (5)
Most tournament finalsEstonia Anett Kontaveit (7)
Prize money leaderAustralia Ashleigh Barty ($3,945,182)
Points leaderAustralia Ashleigh Barty (6,411)
Awards
Player of the yearAustralia Ashleigh Barty
Doubles team of the yearCzech Republic Barbora Krej?íková
Czech Republic Kate?ina Siniaková
Most improved
player of the year
Czech Republic Barbora Krej?íková
Newcomer of the yearUnited Kingdom Emma Raducanu
Comeback
player of the year
Spain Carla Suárez Navarro
2020
2022
Naomi Osaka won her fourth major title and second Australian Open title, defeating Jennifer Brady in the final. Barbora Krej?íková won her first major singles title at the French Open, defeating Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in the final. Ashleigh Barty won her second major singles title at Wimbledon, defeating Karolína Plí?ková in the final. Emma Raducanu won her first major title at the US Open, defeating Leylah Fernandez in the final and becoming the first qualifier, man or woman, to win a major title.

The 2021 WTA Tour was the elite professional tennis circuit organised by the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) for the 2021 tennis season. The 2021 WTA Tour calendar comprises the Grand Slam tournaments (supervised by the International Tennis Federation (ITF)), the WTA 1000 tournaments, the WTA 500 tournaments, the WTA 250 tournaments, the Billie Jean King Cup (organized by the ITF), and the year-end championships (the WTA Finals and the WTA Elite Trophy). Also included in the 2021 calendar are the Summer Olympic Games, which were rescheduled from 2020.

Schedule

This is the complete schedule of events on the 2021 calendar.[1]

Key

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

Tournaments affected by COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic affected tournaments on both the ATP and WTA tours. The following tournaments were cancelled or postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Statistical information

These tables present the number of singles (S), doubles (D), and mixed doubles (X) titles won by each player and each nation during the season, within all the tournament categories of the 2019 WTA Tour: the Grand Slam tournaments, the year-end championships (the WTA Tour Championships and the WTA Elite Trophy), the WTA Premier tournaments (WTA 1000 and WTA 500), and the WTA 250. The players/nations are sorted by:

  1. total number of titles (a doubles title won by two players representing the same nation counts as only one win for the nation);
  2. cumulated importance of those titles (one Grand Slam win equalling two WTA 1000 wins, one year-end championships win equalling one-and-a-half WTA 1000 win, one WTA 1000 win equalling two WTA 500 wins, one WTA 500 win equalling two WTA 250 wins);
  3. a singles > doubles > mixed doubles hierarchy;
  4. alphabetical order (by family names for players).

Key

Grand Slam tournaments
Summer Olympics
Year-end championships
WTA 1000 (Mandatory)
WTA 1000 (Non-mandatory)
WTA 500
WTA 250

Titles won by player

Titles won by nation

Titles information

The following players won their first main circuit title in singles, doubles, or mixed doubles:

Singles
Doubles
Mixed doubles

The following players defended a main circuit title in singles, doubles, or mixed doubles:

Singles
Doubles
Mixed doubles

Best ranking

The following players achieved their career high ranking in this season inside top 50 (in bold the players who entered the top 10 for the first time).

[c]
Singles
Doubles

WTA rankings

These are the WTA rankings and yearly WTA Race rankings of the top 20 singles and doubles players at the current date of the 2021 season.

Singles

Number 1 ranking

Doubles

Number 1 ranking

Points distribution

Category W F SF QF R16 R32 R64 R128 Q Q3 Q2 Q1
Grand Slam (S) 2000 1300 780 430 240 130 70 10 40 30 20 2
Grand Slam (D) 2000 1300 780 430 240 130 10 - 40 - - -
WTA Finals (S) 1500* 1080* 750* (+125 per Round Robin Match; +125 per Round Robin Win)
WTA Finals (D) 1500 1080 750 375 -
WTA 1000 (96S) 1000 650 390 215 120 65 35 10 30 - 20 2
WTA 1000 (64/60S) 1000 650 390 215 120 65 10 - 30 - 20 2
WTA 1000 (28/32D) 1000 650 390 215 120 10 - - - - - -
WTA 1000 (56S, 48Q/32Q) 900 585 350 190 105 60 1 - 30 - 20 1
WTA 1000 (28D) 900 585 350 190 105 1 - - - - - -
WTA 500 (64/56S) 470 305 185 100 55 30 1 - 25 - 13 1
WTA 500 (32/30/28S) 470 305 185 100 55 1 - - 25 18 13 1
WTA 500 (28D) 470 305 185 100 55 1 - - - - - -
WTA 500 (16D) 470 305 185 100 1 - - - - - - -
WTA Elite Trophy (S) 700* 440* 240* (+40 per Round Robin Match; +80 per Round Robin Win)
WTA 250 (32S, 32Q) 280 180 110 60 30 1 - - 18 14 10 1
WTA 250 (32S, 24/16Q) 280 180 110 60 30 1 - - 18 - 12 1
WTA 250 (28D) 280 180 110 60 30 1 - - - - - -
WTA 250 (16D) 280 180 110 60 1 - - - - - - -

S = singles players, D = doubles teams, Q = qualification players.
* Assumes undefeated Round Robin match record.

Prize money leaders

Prize money in US$ as of November 15, 2021[20]
# Player Singles Doubles Mixed doubles Year-to-date
1  Ashleigh Barty (AUS) $3,914,987 $30,195 $0 $3,945,182
2  Barbora Krej?íková (CZE) $2,969,248 $616,781 $60,854 $3,646,883
3  Aryna Sabalenka (BLR) $2,664,681 $235,522 $0 $2,909,281
4  Karolína Plí?ková (CZE) $2,829,000 $39,865 $0 $2,868,865
5  Garbiñe Muguruza (ESP) $2,827,274 $3,905 $0 $2,846,871
6  Emma Raducanu (GBR) $2,807,446 $0 $0 $2,807,446
7  Paula Badosa (ESP) $2,602,330 $52,132 $0 $2,655,962
8  Naomi Osaka (JPN) $2,306,222 $0 $0 $2,306,222
9  Elise Mertens (BEL) $1,162,626 $933,007 $0 $2,098,133
10  Maria Sakkari (GRE) $2,021,970 $8,020 $0 $2,029,990

Comebacks

The following is a list of notable players (winners of a main tour title, and/or part of the WTA rankings top 100 in singles, or top 100 in doubles, for at least one week) who returned from retirement or inactivity during the 2021 season:

Retirements

The following is a list of notable players (winners of a main tour title, and/or part of the WTA rankings top 100 in singles, or top 100 in doubles, for at least one week) who announced their retirement from professional tennis, became inactive (after not playing for more than 52 weeks), or were permanently banned from playing, during the 2021 season:

  • Hungary Gréta Arn (born 13 April 1979 in Budapest, Hungary) joined the professional tour in 1997 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 40 in singles in May 2011 and No. 175 in doubles in December 2000. She won two singles titles in her career.[28]
  • Switzerland Timea Bacsinszky (born 8 June 1989 in Lausanne, Switzerland), has won four WTA singles titles in her 15-year career, where she reached a career high of No.9, and five doubles titles. She reached the semifinals of French Open in singles in 2015 and 2017. She also won a silver medal in doubles with Martina Hingis at 2016 Rio Olympics. Bacsinszky announced her retirement on 16 July due to constant injuries.[29]
  • Netherlands Kiki Bertens (born 10 December 1991 in Wateringen, Netherlands) turned professional in 2009, and reached a career high ranking of No. 4 in singles on 13 May 2019, becoming the highest ranking female Dutch player in WTA history; she had a career high doubles ranking of No. 16 in the world, achieved on 16 April 2018. She won 10 WTA singles titles, including two WTA 1000 titles at the 2018 Western & Southern Open and the 2019 Mutua Madrid Open, and also won 10 WTA doubles titles. Furthermore, she reached the quarterfinals of the 2017 Wimbledon Championships, and the semifinals on the 2016 French Open. She announced on 16 June 2021 that 2021 will be her final season due to ongoing injuries, and that her final event would be the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.[30] Bertens officially retired from the sport after opening round defeats in both singles and doubles at the Olympics, ranked No. 24 in singles and No. 112 in doubles.
  • United States Nicole Gibbs (born 3 March 1993 in Cincinnati, United States) joined the professional tour in 2013 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 68 in singles in July 2016 and No. 107 in doubles in September 2016. She announced her retirement in February 2021 after battling with oral cancer in 2019 and plans to attend law school.[31]
  • Germany Anna-Lena Grönefeld
  • Serbia Bojana Jovanovski Petrovi?
  • United States Vania King (born 3 February 1989 in Monterey Park, California, United States) turned professional in 2006 and reached a career high ranking of 50 in singles and 3 in doubles. King reached three WTA singles finals during her career, winning one of them at the Bangkok Open in 2006. She was most known as a doubles specialist, winning fifteen titles in her career, with her biggest achievements coming in winning the women's doubles events at both Wimbledon and the US Open in 2010, alongside Yaroslava Shvedova. King was hampered by an ankle injury throughout the final years of her career, and despite undergoing surgery in 2017, King decided to retire in February 2020[32] however due to the impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic, she officially retired in April 2021 following a farewell tour.[33]
  • United Kingdom Johanna Konta (born 17 May 1991 in Sydney, Australia) turned professional in 2008, initially representing Australia, before switching allegiance to Great Britain in 2012. She reached a career high singles ranking of No. 4 in the world on 17 July 2017, becoming the first British woman since Jo Durie to be ranked inside the top ten; she had a career high doubles ranking of No. 88 in the world, achieved on 1 August 2016. Konta won four WTA singles titles, including a Premier Mandatory title at the 2017 Miami Open, and became the first British woman to win a singles title on home soil since Sue Barker did so in 1981, doing so at the 2021 Nottingham Open. She reached the quarterfinals or better at all four Grand Slams, including reaching the semifinals at the 2016 Australian Open, 2017 Wimbledon Championships, and the 2019 French Open. Konta announced her retirement on 1 December 2021, after suffering from a long-term knee injury, and a rankings slide to No. 113 in the world.[34][35]
  • Russia Alla Kudryavtseva (born 3 November 1987 in Moscow, Russia) turned professional in 2005 and reached a career high ranking of No. 56 in singles and No. 15 in doubles. Kudryavtseva reached two WTA singles finals during her career, winning one of them at the 2010 Tashkent Open. She was better known for her doubles prowess, winning nine doubles titles throughout her career, and reached the quarterfinals in women's doubles events at the Australian Open, Wimbledon Championships, and the US Open. She announced that she had retired from the sport on Instagram, on 2 November 2021.[36]
  • Czech Republic Barbora Strýcová (born 28 March 1986 in Plze?, Czech Republic), the No. 2 player in doubles as of 5 April 2021 and former No. 1 player (from July 2019), announced her retirement on 4 May 2021.[37] Strýcová joined the professional tour in 2002 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 16 in singles in January 2017. She has won 31 doubles titles and 2 singles titles (Québec 2011, Linz 2017), as well as the bronze medal in women's doubles at the 2016 Olympics. She reached the singles semifinals and won the women's doubles title at the 2019 Wimbledon Championships and was also a member of the winning Czech Fed Cup team in 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2018.
  • Spain Carla Suárez Navarro (born 3 September 1988 in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain) turned professional in 2003. Suárez Navarro reached a career-high singles ranking of No. 6 in the world on 29 February 2016; her career-high doubles ranking was No. 11, achieved on 27 April 2015. Suárez Navarro won two WTA singles titles, including a WTA 1000 title at the 2016 Qatar Open, and won three WTA doubles titles. She also reached the quarterfinals in singles on multiple occasions at the Australian Open, French Open, and the US Open. In doubles, she reached the semifinals of the 2014 French Open, and the final of the 2015 WTA Finals, both with Garbiñe Muguruza. Suárez Navarro previously announced her retirement in 2020; in September 2020, she was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma. In April 2021, She announced that her cancer was in complete remission, and that she would commence a farewell tour beginning at Roland-Garros. She retired from the sport after her participation at the 2020-21 Billie Jean King Cup Finals, in November 2021.[22]
  • Kazakhstan Yaroslava Shvedova (born 12 September 1987 in Moscow, Russia), turned professional in September 2005, representing Russia; Shvedova switched representation to Kazakhstan in 2008. She reached a career-high singles ranking of No. 25 in the world on 29 October 2012; she attained a career-high doubles ranking of No. 3 in the world on 22 February 2016. She reached two WTA singles finals, winning her only title at the 2007 Bangalore Open; she also reached the quarterfinals of three Grand Slam events in singles, at the 2010 and 2012 French Opens, and the 2016 Wimbledon Championships. Known for her doubles prowess, Shvedova won 13 WTA doubles titles, including two Grand Slam titles at the 2010 Wimbledon Championships and 2010 US Open, partnering Vania King; she also reached four further Grand Slam doubles finals, and reached the final of the 2010 French Open in Mixed Doubles partnering Julian Knowle. Shvedova holds the distinction of being the only player in tennis history to score a golden set in a Grand Slam main match; she achieved this feat in her third round match against then-world No. 10 Sara Errani at the 2012 Wimbledon Championships. Shvedova retired on 2 October 2021, after a commemorative ceremony held at the 2021 Astana Open, in Nur-Sultan.
  • United States Abigail Spears
  • United Kingdom Jordanne Whiley
  • Bulgaria Elitsa Kostova

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d These tournaments are still distributed by points:
    • 1000 points (WTA 1000; mandatory)
    • 900 points (WTA 1000; non-mandatory)
    • 470 points (WTA 500)
    • 280 points (WTA 250)
  2. ^ Qualifying matches were held at Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 10-13 January due to Australia's quarantine restrictions.[3]
  3. ^ Name and ranking in bold means the player entered top 10 for the first time, and only the ranking in bold means the player had entered top 10 before, but it's his/her highest ranking.

References

  1. ^ a b "WTA announces start of 2021 Tour season". WTA. 19 December 2020.
  2. ^ WTA [@WTA] (February 6, 2021). "Due to the delayed schedule and the start of the Australian Open on Monday, the final of the Grampians Trophy will not be played..." (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  3. ^ "Dubai to host Australian Open 2021 women's qualifying". ausopen.com. Archived from the original on 12 January 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  4. ^ "Puntodebreak". Puntodebreak.
  5. ^ Bisti, Riccardo. "Parma si prende tutto: arriva anche un torneo WTA!". TENNIS MAGAZINE ITALIA.
  6. ^ "French Open". French Open postponed by one week in hope more fans can attend. 8 April 2021.
  7. ^ "Moin Ladies. From July 7th to 11th, 2021, the tennis ladies are back in Hamburg!". Hamburg European Open. 22 April 2021.
  8. ^ "Indian Wells tennis to be played Oct. 4-17 in SoCal desert". USA Today. Associated Press. 1 July 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  9. ^ "Brisbane Tennis to return in 2022". 16 November 2020.
  10. ^ "ASB Classic, Auckland tuneup event for Australian Open, canceled due to pandemic". 6 October 2020.
  11. ^ "Star-studded line-up to play official curtain raiser in Adelaide". ausopen.com. 9 January 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  12. ^ "BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament rescheduled for October 2021 at Indian Wells". The Desert Sun. 20 May 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  13. ^ Billie Jean King Cup [@BJKCup] (February 18, 2021). "The International Tennis Federation and the Hungarian National Sports Agency..." (Tweet). Retrieved 2021 – via Twitter.
  14. ^ "Billie Jean King Cup Finals to take place in November at Prague's O2 Arena". Billie Jean King Cup. 28 August 2021.
  15. ^ "WTA ANNOUNCES 2021 CALENDAR UPDATE". Women's Tennis Association. 1 July 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  16. ^ "2021 WTA Finals to be held in Guadalajara, Mexico". Women's Tennis Association. 13 September 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  17. ^ a b "Porsche Rate to the WTA Finals" (PDF). wtatennis.com. WTA Tour, Inc. 8 November 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-06-24.
  18. ^ "Singles Rankings Numeric List for 15 November 2021" (PDF). wtatour.com. WTA Tour, Inc. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-05-17.
  19. ^ "Doubles Rankings Numeric List for 15 November 2021" (PDF). Women's Tennis Association.
  20. ^ "WTA Year-to-date prize money" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-08-07.
  21. ^ "Carla Suarez Navarro returns to French Open after cancer treatment - Sportsnet.ca". www.sportsnet.ca. Retrieved .
  22. ^ a b "Cancer-free Suarez Navarro preparing for final farewell tour". Women's Tennis Association.
  23. ^ "FINALRUNNER-UP: $1,250,000 / WINNER: $2,500,000". www.usopen.org. Archived from the original on 2016-08-30. Retrieved 2021.
  24. ^ "Vesnina returns from retirement for Tokyo 2020 + 1?". 3 December 2020. Archived from the original on 2021-02-19.
  25. ^ Now, Tennis (18 Jan 2021). "Former Doubles World No. 1 Vesnina Plans Comeback in 2021". YouTube. Archived from the original on 2021-04-29.
  26. ^ "Clijsters set to make latest comeback at Chicago". Reuters. 9 September 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  27. ^ "Clijsters, 38, falls in three sets in WTA Tour return". ESPN.com. Sep 27, 2021.
  28. ^ Gy. Szabó Csilla (10 March 2021). "Gréta az akadályokból merítette erejét" (in Hungarian). tenisz-palya.hu. Retrieved 2021.
  29. ^ "Swiss star Timea Bacsinszky announces retirement".
  30. ^ "Kiki Bertens announces 2021 will be her final season".
  31. ^ "Nicole Gibbs announces retirement from tennis at age 27". Espn. 16 February 2021.
  32. ^ "Vania King set to step away from the game". Baseline. 26 February 2020. Archived from the original on 2021-04-01. Retrieved .
  33. ^ @queen_v21 (April 6, 2021). "This is my final farewell to the professional tennis life..." (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  34. ^ Carayol, Tumaini (1 November 2021). "'I got to live my dreams': Johanna Konta announces retirement from tennis". The Guardian. Retrieved 2021.
  35. ^ "Johanna Konta announces retirement from tennis". Women's Tennis Association.
  36. ^ "Alla Kudyavtseva on Instagram". 2 November 2021. Archived from the original on 2021-12-26. Retrieved 2021.
  37. ^ "Barbora Strycova announces retirement, hopes for Wimbledon farewell". wtatennis.com. Retrieved 2021.

External links


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