2022 ATP Tour
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2022 ATP Tour

2022 ATP Tour
Details
Duration1 January 2022 - 27 November 2022
Edition53rd
Tournaments68
CategoriesGrand Slam (4)
ATP Finals
ATP Masters 1000 (8)
ATP Cup
ATP 500 (13)
ATP 250
Next Generation ATP Finals
Davis Cup
Laver Cup
Achievements (singles)
Most tournament titlesSpain Carlos Alcaraz
Serbia Novak Djokovic (5)
Most tournament finalsSpain Carlos Alcaraz
Serbia Novak Djokovic
Norway Casper Ruud
Greece Stefanos Tsitsipas (7)
Prize money leaderSerbia Novak Djokovic ($9,934,582)[1]
Points leaderSpain Carlos Alcaraz (6,820)[2]
2021
2023
Rafael Nadal won his second Australian Open title and record-breaking 21st major title, defeating Daniil Medvedev in the final. He then won his record-extending 14th French Open and 22nd major title, defeating Casper Ruud in the final. Novak Djokovic won his seventh Wimbledon title and 21st major singles title overall, defeating Nick Kyrgios in the final. Carlos Alcaraz won his maiden major title at the US Open, defeating Ruud in the final. With the victory, Alcaraz ascended to world No. 1 on the ATP rankings, making him the youngest player to ever hold the top position.

The 2022 ATP Tour is the global elite men's professional tennis circuit organised by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for the 2022 tennis season. The 2022 ATP Tour calendar comprises the Grand Slam tournaments (supervised by the International Tennis Federation (ITF)), the ATP Finals, the ATP Tour Masters 1000, the ATP Cup, the ATP 500 series and the ATP 250 series. Also included in the 2022 calendar are the Davis Cup (organised by the ITF), Wimbledon, the Next Gen ATP Finals, and Laver Cup, none of which distribute ranking points. As part of international sports' reaction to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the ATP, the WTA (Women's Tennis Association), the ITF, and the four Grand Slam tournaments jointly announced on 1 March that players from Belarus and Russia would not be allowed to play in tournaments under the names or flags of their countries, but would remain eligible to play events until further notice.[3] On 20 May 2022, the ATP, ITF, and WTA announced that ranking points would not be awarded for Wimbledon, due to the All England Club's decision to prohibit players from Belarus or Russia from participating in the tournament.[4]

Schedule

This is the schedule of events on the 2022 calendar.[5][6][7]

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

Affected tournaments

Statistical information

These tables present the number of singles (S), doubles (D), and mixed doubles (X) titles won by each player and each nation during the season, within all the tournament categories of the 2022 calendar : the Grand Slam tournaments, the ATP Finals, the ATP Tour Masters 1000, the ATP Tour 500 tournaments, and the ATP Tour 250 tournaments. The players/nations are sorted by:

  1. Total number of titles (a doubles title won by two players representing the same nation counts as only one win for the nation);
  2. Cumulated importance of those titles (one Grand Slam win equalling two Masters 1000 wins, one undefeated ATP Finals win equalling one-and-a-half Masters 1000 win, one Masters 1000 win equalling two 500 events wins, one 500 event win equalling two 250 events wins);
  3. A singles > doubles > mixed doubles hierarchy;
  4. Alphabetical order (by family names for players).

Titles won by player

Titles won by nation

Titles information

The following players won their first main circuit title in singles, doubles or mixed doubles:

Singles
Doubles
Mixed doubles

The following players defended a main circuit title in singles, doubles, or mixed doubles:

Singles
Doubles
Mixed doubles

Best ranking

The following players achieved their career high ranking in this season inside top 50 (in bold the players who entered the top 10 or became the world No. 1 for the first time):[b]

Singles
Doubles

ATP rankings

Below are the tables for the yearly ATP Race rankings[c] and the ATP rankings[d] of the top 20 singles players, doubles players, and doubles teams.

Singles

No. 1 ranking

Holder Date gained Date forfeited
 Novak Djokovic (SRB) Year end 2021 27 February 2022
 Daniil Medvedev (RUS) 28 February 2022 20 March 2022
 Novak Djokovic (SRB) 21 March 2022 12 June 2022
 Daniil Medvedev (RUS) 13 June 2022 11 September 2022
 Carlos Alcaraz (ESP) 12 September 2022 Year end 2022

Doubles

No. 1 ranking

Point distribution

Points are awarded as follows:[13][note 1]

Category W F SF QF R16 R32 R64 R128 Q Q3 Q2 Q1
Grand Slam (128S, except Wimbledon) 2000 1200 720 360 180 90 45 10 25 16 8 0
Grand Slam (64D, except Wimbledon) 2000 1200 720 360 180 90 0 - 25 - 0 0
ATP Finals (8S/8D) 1500 (max) 1100 (min) 1000 (max) 600 (min) 600 (max)
200 (min)
200 for each round robin match win,
+400 for a semifinal win, +500 for the final win.
ATP Tour Masters 1000 (96S) 1000 600 360 180 90 45 25 10 16 - 8 0
ATP Tour Masters 1000 (56S) 1000 600 360 180 90 45 10 - 25 - 16 0
ATP Tour Masters 1000 (32D) 1000 600 360 180 90 0 - - - - - -
ATP Tour 500 (48S) 500 300 180 90 45 20 0 - 10 - 4 0
ATP Tour 500 (32S/28S) 500 300 180 90 45 0 - - 20 - 10 0
ATP Tour 500 (16D) 500 300 180 90 0 - - - 45 - 25 0
ATP Tour 250 (56S/48S) 250 150 90 45 20 10 0 - 5 - 3 0
ATP Tour 250 (32S/28S) 250 150 90 45 20 0 - - 12 - 6 0
ATP Tour 250 (16D) 250 150 90 45 0 - - - - - - -
ATP Cup For details, see 2022 ATP Cup
  1. ^ Wimbledon was stripped of its ranking points as a result of the All England Club's decision to completely ban Russian and Belarusian athletes from competing.[14]

Prize money leaders

Prize money in US$ as of 21 November 2022[1]
# Player Singles Doubles Year-to-date
1  Novak Djokovic (SRB) $9,934,582 $0 $9,934,582
2  Carlos Alcaraz (ESP) $7,627,613 $27,517 $7,655,130
3  Rafael Nadal (ESP) $7,440,806 $1,270 $7,442,076
4  Casper Ruud (NOR) $6,930,042 $12,274 $6,942,316
5  Stefanos Tsitsipas (GRE) $5,479,442 $168,974 $5,648,416
6  Taylor Fritz (USA) $4,489,807 $80,674 $4,570,481
7  Andrey Rublev (RUS) $4,106,247 $123,707 $4,229,954
8  Félix Auger-Aliassime (CAN) $4,107,342 $78,700 $4,186,042
9  Daniil Medvedev (RUS) $4,146,312 $32,212 $4,178,524
10  Nick Kyrgios (AUS) $2,916,349 $574,115 $3,490,464

Retirements

The following is a list of notable players (winners of a main tour title, and/or part of the ATP rankings top 100 in singles, or top 100 in doubles, for at least one week) who announced their retirement from professional tennis, became inactive (after not playing for more than 52 weeks), or were permanently banned from playing, during the 2022 season:

Anderson (pictured in 2017) was a former world No. 5 and two-time Grand Slam finalist
  • South Africa Kevin Anderson (born 18 May 1986 in Johannesburg, South Africa) joined the professional tour in 2007 and was ranked as high as world No. 5, won seven singles titles on the ATP Tour, and twice was a major finalist, at the 2017 US Open and the 2018 Wimbledon Championships. He played his final professional match in the first round of the Miami Open which he lost.[15][16]
  • Slovenia Alja? Bedene (born 18 July 1989 in Ljubljana, SFR Yugoslavia (now Slovenia)) turned professional in 2008 and reached a career-high singles ranking of No. 43 in 2018. In early 2022, he announced he would retire at the end of the season after Slovenia's Davis Cup tie to become a soccer agent.[17][18]
  • Belgium Ruben Bemelmans (born 14 January 1988 in Genk, Belgium) joined the professional tour in 2006 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 84 in singles in September 2015 and no. 128 in doubles in October 2012. He won one title in doubles. He played his last singles professional match in the qualifying draw at the Antwerp Open.[19][20]
  • Brazil Rogério Dutra Silva (born 3 February 1984 in São Paulo, Brazil) joined the professional tour in 2003 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 63 in singles in July 2017, and No. 84 in doubles, in February 2018. He won one title in doubles. He played his last match at the Rio Open in the doubles tournament.[21]
  • Israel Jonathan Erlich announced his retirement after his participation at the 2022 Tel Aviv Open in September.[22]
Federer (pictured in 2015) was a former world No. 1 and twenty-time Grand Slam champion. He announced his retirement before the 2022 Laver Cup.
  • Switzerland Roger Federer (born 8 August 1981 in Basel, Switzerland) joined the professional tour in 1998 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 1 in singles in February 2004, and No. 24 in doubles, in June 2003. He won 103 titles in singles, including 20 major titles. He played his last match in doubles at the Laver Cup.
  • Colombia Alejandro González (born 7 February 1989 in Medellín, Colombia), joined the professional tour in 2010 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 70 in singles, in June 2014 and of No. 177 in doubles, in August 2010. In March he played his last match at the Pereira Challenger in the singles tournament, where he lost in the second round.
  • United Kingdom Dominic Inglot won 14 doubles titles and reached No. 18 in the rankings. Announced his retirement in March 2022.[23]
  • Germany Tobias Kamke (born 21 May 1986 in Lübeck, Germany) joined the professional tour in 2004 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 64 in singles in January 2011 and No. 144 in doubles in September 2015. Though he did not win any career tour-level titles, he was named "ATP Newcomer of the Year" in 2010 after contesting four Challenger finals, winning two of them, and reaching the third round at Wimbledon, thus slashing his ranking from No. 254 to No. 67 by year-end. Kamke played his last professional match at the Hamburg Open in the doubles tournament with Dustin Brown, where he lost in the first round.[24]
  • Slovenia Bla? Kav?i? (born 5 March 1987 in Ljubljana, SFR Yugoslavia (now Slovenia)) joined the professional tour in 2005 and reached a career-high singles ranking of No. 68 in 2012. In April, he announced he would retire at the end of the season in September after the Davis Cup.[25][26]
  • Germany Philipp Kohlschreiber (born 16 October 1983 in Augsburg, Germany) joined the professional tour in 2002 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 16 in singles, in July 2012. He won eight singles titles and made 68 Grand Slam main draw appearances. He retired from professional tennis after losing the second round match of the Wimbledon qualifying tournament.[27][28]
  • Spain Marc López (born 31 July 1982 in Barcelona, Spain) joined the professional tour in 1999 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 106 in singles in May 2004, and of No. 3 in doubles in January 2013. He won 14 titles in doubles, including the 2016 French Open. He won a gold medal for Spain in doubles at the 2016 Olympic Games. His anticipated final appearance came at the Barcelona Open, where he and long-time partner Feliciano López defeated the world No. 1 team of Joe Salisbury and Rajeev Ram.[29][30] However, he received an additional wildcard for the Madrid Open to partner with Carlos Alcaraz in doubles, where he lost in the second round.[31]
  • Germany Yannick Maden (born 28 October 1989 in Stuttgart, Germany) joined the professional tour in 2013 and achieved a career-high ranking of No. 96 in singles in June 2019. He played his last match at the Lille Challenger in March.[32]
  • Spain David Marrero (born 8 April 1980 in Las Palmas, Spain) joined the professional tour in 2001, winning 14 titles and reaching a career-high doubles ranking of World No. 5 in November 2013. He retired at the Barcelona Open, where he played his last professional match.[33][34]
  • United States Nicholas Monroe (born April 12, 1982 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S.) joined the professional tour in 2004 and reached a career-high doubles ranking of No. 30 in 2017. He won four ATP doubles titles, all of which were at ATP 250 tournaments. Monroe announced his retirement in August ahead of the 2022 US Open and explained it would be his final professional tournament.[35]
  • Denmark Frederik Nielsen joined the professional tour in 2001 and won the 2012 Wimbledon doubles title. He played his last match at the Davis Cup in September 2022.[36]
  • United States Sam Querrey (born October 7, 1987 San Francisco, California, U.S.) joined the professional tour in 2006 and reached a career-high singles ranking of No. 11 in 2018 and doubles ranking of No. 23 in 2010. He won ten singles titles, including two ATP 500 titles in Memphis and Acapulco, and five doubles titles, including one ATP Masters 1000 title in Rome. He announced his retirement on August 30 and played his last matches in singles and doubles at the US Open.[37][38]
Robredo (pictured in 2011) reached a career-high ranking of No. 5 in singles in 2006 and won 12 singles titles
  • Spain Tommy Robredo (born 1 May 1982 in Hostalric, Spain) joined the professional tour in 1998 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 5 in singles, in August 2006 and of No. 16 in doubles, in April 2009. In singles, he won twelve titles, including the 2006 Hamburg Masters. He also won the Davis Cup three times (in 2004, 2008 and 2009). In doubles, he won five titles, including the 2018 Monte-Carlo Masters, and reached the semifinals of the US Open three times (in 2004, 2008 and 2010). His final tournament was at the Barcelona Open, where he made his ATP Tour debut 23 years prior.[39]
  • Israel Dudi Sela he announced his plans in January to retire after the 2022 season.[40]
  • Italy Andreas Seppi (born 21 February 1984 in Bolzano, Italy) joined the professional tour in 2002 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 18 in singles, in January 2013. He has been Italy's No. 1 for 215 weeks. He won 3 singles titles, being the first italian winning a tournament on grass. He has a record of 66 consecutive appereances in the Grand Slam tournaments (the third highest number ever reached by any male tennis player). He has announced he will retire after the Challenger in Ortisei, his hometown.[41][42]
  • France Gilles Simon (born 27 December 1984 in Nice, France) joined the professional tour in 2002 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 6 in singles, in January 2009. He won 14 singles titles, and reached the finals of the Madrid Masters in 2008 (lost to Andy Murray) and the Shanghai Masters in 2014 (lost to Roger Federer). He announced his retirement at the end of the season.[43]
  • United Kingdom Ken Skupski (born 9 April 1983 in Liverpool, England, United Kingdom) joined the professional tour in 2001. He announced his retirement after Wimbledon where he played his last match on 4 July 2022.[44]
  • Brazil Bruno Soares played his last match at the 2022 US Open with Jamie Murray.[45]
  • Ukraine Sergiy Stakhovsky (born 6 January 1986 in Kyiv, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union) joined the professional tour in 2003 and reached a career-high ranking of No. 31 in singles, in September 2010 and of No. 33 in doubles, in June 2011. He won four titles in singles and four titles in doubles. He played his last match at the Australian Open qualifying draw.
  • Romania Horia Tec?u (born 19 January 1985 in Constan?a, Romania), former World No. 2 in doubles, won 38 doubles titles. The 36-year-old Romanian won 20 trophies with Jean-Julien Rojer and the pair finished 2015 as the year-end No. 1 team and Nitto ATP Finals champions. Together, they won the 2015 Wimbledon and 2017 US Open crowns. Tec?u played his last match at the 2021 ATP Finals before his retirement on 18 November 2021.[46][47][48][49] He made a brief comeback at the 2022 Davis Cup Qualifying Round with Marius Copil, where they won their match against Spain.[50]
Tsonga (pictured in 2012) was a former world No. 5, one-time Grand Slam finalist, and two-time Masters 1000 champion

Comebacks

The following is a list of notable players (winners of a main tour title, and/or part of the ATP rankings top 100 in singles, or top 100 in doubles, for at least one week) who returned from retirement during the 2022 season:

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d As of 1 March 2022, the ATP announced that players from Russia and Belarus will not compete in tournaments under the name or flag of Russia or Belarus due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.[11]
  2. ^ Name and ranking in bold means the player entered top 10 or became world No. 1 for the first time, and only the ranking in bold means the player had entered the top 10 previously but reached a new career high ranking.
  3. ^ The ATP Race rankings measure the points a player (for singles) or team (for doubles) has accumulated over the season leading up to the year-end ATP Finals.
  4. ^ The ATP rankings are the weekly computer ratings defined by the ATP and are based on a rolling, 52-week cumulative system.

References

  1. ^ a b "ATP Prize Money Leaders" (PDF). Protennslive.com. Retrieved 2022.
  2. ^ a b "ATP Race To Turin". ATP Tour. Retrieved 2022.
  3. ^ "Joint Statement by the International Governing Bodies of Tennis". ATP Tour. 1 March 2022.
  4. ^ "Wimbledon to lose ranking points over player ban". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2022.
  5. ^ "ATP Releases Calendar For Opening Half Of 2022 Season". ATP Tour. 25 November 2021.
  6. ^ "Tournaments". ATP Tour. 22 December 2021.
  7. ^ "2022 ATP Calendar" (PDF). ATP Tour. Archived from the original on 4 March 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  8. ^ "Tennis: ASB Classic cancelled for second straight year". The New Zealand Herald. 29 June 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  9. ^ a b "ATP Issues 2022 Calendar Updates". ATP Tour. Retrieved 2022.
  10. ^ "Joint Statement by the International Governing Bodies of Tennis". ATP Tour. Retrieved 2022.
  11. ^ "Joint Statement by the International Governing Bodies of Tennis". ATP. Retrieved 2022.
  12. ^ "ATP Rankings - Doubles Team Rankings". ATP Tour.
  13. ^ "2022 ATP Official Rulebook - FedEx ATP Rankings" (PDF). ATP Tour. Retrieved 2021.
  14. ^ "Wimbledon stripped of ranking points over ban on Russian players". the Guardian. 20 May 2022. Retrieved 2022.
  15. ^ "Kevin Anderson Announces Retirement: 'I Gave It My Best'". ATP Tour.
  16. ^ "Former Wimbledon finalist Kevin Anderson, 35, announces retirement". Tennis.com. Retrieved 2022.
  17. ^ "Djokovic subdues Bedene in third-round repeat - Roland-Garros - the 2023 Roland-Garros Tournament official site".
  18. ^ "Aljaz Bedene will leave tennis to be a soccer agent and already sees Djokovic as the GOAT". 27 May 2022.
  19. ^ "Two-time Davis Cup finalist Ruben Bemelmans retires from tennis". 21 June 2022. Retrieved 2022.
  20. ^ "Ruben Bemelmans Ends Singles Career in Antwerp". 17 October 2022.
  21. ^ "Dutra Silva On Rio Finale: 'It Was A Perfect Way To End My ATP Career'". ATP Tour.
  22. ^ "Novak Djokovic to play doubles with player with which he won his lone doubles title".
  23. ^ ""I was able to live out my dreams" - Dom Inglot announces his retirement from tennis".
  24. ^ Rönnau, Jürgen (15 July 2022). "Finale am Rothenbaum: Der Lübecker Tennis-Profi Tobias Kamke beendet ATP-Karriere". Lübecker Nachrichten (in German). Retrieved 2022.
  25. ^ Marko Hrastar [@markohrastar] (23 April 2022). "Bla? Kav?i? gave a long interview pending his retirement in September, so I decided to share some answers with you guys. I promise there are some really good anecdotes too (1/n)" (Tweet). Retrieved 2022 – via Twitter.
  26. ^ "Konec je kariere enega najbolj prepoznavnih obrazov slovenskega tenisa".
  27. ^ "Philipp Kohlschreiber reveals Wimbledon will be his final tournament after "a great and wonderful career"". Tennis.com. 20 June 2022.
  28. ^ "Wimbledon: Philipp Kohlschreiber - end of career in Roehampton". tennisnet.com. 22 June 2022.
  29. ^ "Marc Lopez Feeling Lucky & Excited About New Role Coaching Rafael Nadal". ATP Tour.
  30. ^ Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell [@bcnopenbs] (23 April 2022). "G R À C I E S ? M A R C @ATPTour_ES | @marclopeztarres | #BCNOpenBS t.co/hrg85HVubK" (Tweet) (in Catalan). Archived from the original on 23 April 2022. Retrieved 2022 – via Twitter.
  31. ^ "Marc López will have his "Last Dance" in Madrid with Alcaraz". Archysport.com. 30 April 2022.
  32. ^ ATP Challenger Tour [@ATPChallenger] (26 March 2022). "Thank you, Yannick After 10 years on tour, German stalwart Yannick Maden said goodbye to professional tennis this week. The former @ClemsonMTennis standout rose to No. 96 in the ATP rankings and reached 7 #ATPChallenger finals. Wishing Yannick the very best in retirement. t.co/MgbK56ByrD" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 6 April 2022. Retrieved 2022 – via Twitter.
  33. ^ "Honors for David Marrero in Barcelona for his career". 21 April 2022.
  34. ^ Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell [@bcnopenbs] (21 April 2022). "¡Enhorabuena por tu gran carrera! Un homenaje a David Marrero en el @rctb1899 por parte de sus compañeros. @david_marri | @ATPTour_ES | #BCNOpenBS t.co/Bx45uCxN3u" (Tweet) (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 21 April 2022. Retrieved 2022 – via Twitter.
  35. ^ Nicholas Monroe [@nickmonroe10s] (27 August 2022). "No better place to end my career @usopen #onemoretime" (Tweet). Retrieved 2022 – via Twitter.
  36. ^ "'A Hell of a Ride': Wimbledon Champ Frederik Nielsen Retires | ATP Tour | Tennis".
  37. ^ Chiesa, Victoria (30 August 2022). "Sam Querrey readies for final tournament at 2022 US Open". US Open. Retrieved 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  38. ^ Andrew Eichenholz. "'Poetry In Motion': Honouring Sam Querrey". Association of Tennis Professionals.
  39. ^ "Tommy Robredo to Retire: Spaniard Announces Farewell Appearance in Barcelona". ATP Tour.
  40. ^ "Dudi Sela to retire after 2022 season, reveals his plans post-retirement".
  41. ^ "Andreas Seppi annuncia il ritiro: "L'ho capito agli Us Open"". Sky Sport.
  42. ^ "After a "difficult season", Andreas Seppi to call it a career at Ortisei Challenger".
  43. ^ "Gilles Simon Announces He Will Retire At The End of Season". ATP Tour.
  44. ^ "Ken Skupski Plays Final Match, Kevin Krawietz/Andreas Mies Reach Wimbledon QFs | ATP Tour | Tennis". ATP Tour. Retrieved 2022.
  45. ^ "Thank You, Bruno! Locker-Room Favourite Soares Retires | ATP Tour | Tennis".
  46. ^ "Tecau/Krawietz Finish with Turin Win; Romanian Calls in a Career". ATP Tour.
  47. ^ "Departing on his terms, Horia Tecau closes out decorated doubles career with ATP Finals win". Tennis.com. Retrieved 2022.
  48. ^ "3-time Slam champion ends career with win at ATP Finals". Tennishead.com. 18 November 2021.
  49. ^ "Tecau/Krawietz Finish with Turin Win; Romanian Calls in a Career". ATP Tour.
  50. ^ @DavisCup (5 March 2022). "Heroic Horia. Postponing his retirement to compete in this tie, Tecau has kept Romania in contention with a 7-6(2) 6-4 victory alongside @MariusCopil" (Tweet). Retrieved 2022 – via Twitter.
  51. ^ "Tsonga Announces He Will Retire At Roland Garros". ATP Tour.

External links


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