Administrative Divisions of American Samoa
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Administrative Divisions of American Samoa

Districts and unorganized atolls of American Samoa
CategoryCounty equivalent
LocationAmerican Samoa
Number3 districts
2 unorganized atolls
Populations31,819 (Western District) - 0 (Rose Atoll, Swains Island)
Areas27.51 sq mi (71.25 km2) (Western District) - 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2) (Rose Atoll)
Government
Subdivisions

American Samoa is administratively divided into three districts (Western, Eastern and Manu'a) and two unorganized atolls (Swains Island and Rose Atoll). The districts are subdivided into 15 counties,[a] which are composed of 76 villages.[11]

For statistical purposes, the United States Census Bureau counts the three districts and two unorganized atolls as five county equivalents, while treating the actual counties as minor civil divisions.[12]

American Samoa has only one U.S. zip code: 96799.[13]

Divisions

Maps

Statistics

The populations below are from the 2020 census, and the areas are from the 2010 census.

Local government structure

Amata Coleman Radewagen's congressional website said the following about American Samoa's districts:[16]

Each [district] is administered by a district governor who is appointed by the territorial governor. To be qualified as a district governor, an individual must hold a Matai title within the district to which he/she is to be appointed.[16]

The U.S. National Park Service says the following about the structure of villages in American Samoa:[17]

In general each village is made up of a group of aiga (extended families) which include as many relatives as can be claimed. Each aiga is headed by a matai (chief) who represents the family on all matters including the village council, or fono. Matai's hold title to all assets of the aigas, or families, they represent and are responsible for law enforcement and punishment of infractions occurring in their villages. The fono consists of the matais of all the aiga associated with the village. The highest chief of the matais of all the village aigas is the highest chief or the ali'i and heads the fono. Also, each village has a pulenu'u (somewhat like a police chief or mayor) and one or more talking chiefs, tulafale."[17]

Notes

  1. ^ a b c An American Samoan law of 1962 defined 14 counties.[1] The constitution of 1967, signed by delegates from these 14 counties, established 15 counties from then on, separating Fofo from Lealataua.[2] The election law was later revised accordingly,[3][4][5] and the government lists 15 counties, including Fofo with its own chief,[6] representative and senator.[7] The law defining the counties was not revised but the constitution overrides it where inconsistent. However, the U.S. Census Bureau continues to list 14 counties, treating Fofo as part of Lealataua.[8][9][10][11]
  2. ^ a b c d e f The 2010 census listed Aasu village with a land area of 3.40 sq mi (8.81 km2) and all inhabitants in Leasina county in the Western District, and an uninhabited land area of 0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2) in Itu'au county in the Eastern District.[11]
  3. ^ a b c d e f The 2010 census listed Tafuna village with a land area of 2.28 sq mi (5.91 km2) and almost all inhabitants in Tualauta county in the Western District, and a land area of 0.21 sq mi (0.54 km2) and few inhabitants in Itu'au county in the Eastern District.[11]
  4. ^ a b c d e f The 2010 census listed Malaeimi village with a land area of 1.39 sq mi (3.60 km2) and all inhabitants in Tualauta county in the Western District, and an uninhabited land area of 0.26 sq mi (0.67 km2) in Itu'au county in the Eastern District.[11]
  5. ^ a b c d e f The 2010 census listed Nu'uuli village with a land area of 2.41 sq mi (6.24 km2) and some inhabitants in Itu'au county in the Eastern District, and a land area of 0.56 sq mi (1.45 km2) and some inhabitants in Tualauta county in the Western District.[11]
  6. ^ a b c The 2010 census listed Pagai village with a land area of 0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2) and some inhabitants in Sua county, and a land area of 0.11 sq mi (0.28 km2) and some inhabitants in Sa'ole county, all in the Eastern District.[11]
  7. ^ The censuses of 2010 and 2020 treated Fofo as part of Lealataua. The numbers in this row are the sums of the villages of Lealataua without Fofo.[9][11]
  8. ^ The censuses of 2010 and 2020 treated Fofo as part of Lealataua. The numbers in this row are the sums of the villages of Fofo.[9][11]

References

  1. ^ 5.0102 Division of districts into counties, American Samoa Bar Association.
  2. ^ Revised Constitution of American Samoa, American Samoa Bar Association.
  3. ^ 2.0202 Districts, American Samoa Bar Association.
  4. ^ 2.0302 Districts, American Samoa Bar Association.
  5. ^ 6.0102 Definitions, American Samoa Bar Association.
  6. ^ Local Government, American Samoa Government. Archived from the original on December 18, 2020.
  7. ^ American Samoa Legislature (Fono), American Samoa Government.
  8. ^ a b c d Population of American Samoa: 2010 and 2020, United States Census Bureau.
  9. ^ a b c d e 2020 census population of American Samoa: village, United States Census Bureau.
  10. ^ a b c d Population, housing units, land area, and density by district and island and county for American Samoa: 2010, United States Census Bureau.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Population, housing units, land area, and density by place for American Samoa: 2010, United States Census Bureau.
  12. ^ States, Counties, and Statistically Equivalent Entities, United States Census Bureau.
  13. ^ American Samoa ZIP Codes, Zip-codes.com.
  14. ^ Unlocking the Secrets of Swains Island, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, September 2013.
  15. ^ a b 117th Congress of the United States, American Samoa, United States Census Bureau.
  16. ^ a b https://radewagen.house.gov/about/our-district Radewagen.house.gov. Our District. American Samoa - A Territory of the United States. Retrieved September 7, 2019.
  17. ^ a b https://www.nps.gov/npsa/learn/historyculture/people.htm U.S. National Park Service. National Park of American Samoa. History & Culture - People. Retrieved September 7, 2019.

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