Andrew Sznajder
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Andrew Sznajder

Andrew Sznajder
Country (sports) Canada
ResidenceOakville, Ontario, Canada
Born (1967-05-25) 25 May 1967 (age 55)
Preston, England
Height1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Turned pro1988
PlaysRight-handed
CollegePepperdine University
Prize money$419,995
Singles
Career record58-74
Career titles0
1 Challenger, 0 Futures
Highest rankingNo. 46 (25 September 1989)
Grand Slam singles results
Australian Open2R (1990)
French Open2R (1989, 1990)
WimbledonQ3 (1993)
US Open2R (1989)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games2R (1992)
Doubles
Career record7-18
Career titles0
1 Challenger, 0 Futures
Highest rankingNo. 182 (29 July 1991)
Team competitions
Davis CupSF (1992)
Last updated on: 20 October 2021.

Andrew Sznajder (pronounced: shnigh-der) (born 25 May 1967) is a Canadian former professional tour tennis player.

Sznajder achieved a career-high singles ranking of World No. 46 in September 1989. This was the highest any Canadian male was ranked in singles by the ATP until Greg Rusedski made it to No. 41 (before becoming a British citizen; subsequently in February 2011, Milos Raonic reached World No. 37).[1][2] He was inducted into the Canada Tennis Hall of Fame.

Early life

Sznajder was born in Preston, Lancashire, England, moved to Canada at age seven, and is Jewish.[3][4][5][6] He lives in Oakville, Ontario.[7]

Tennis career

He was named Tennis Canada's "Most Improved Player" in 1985, and "Male Player of the Year" in 1986.[3] Over his career, he was a five-time Canada national champion.[7] Sznajder was a record six-time winner of the Canadian Closed singles championship and three-time Tennis Canada singles Player of the Year.[]

Prior to his pro career, Sznajder played college tennis at Pepperdine University for the Pepperdine Waves, and was a two-time All-American selection (1987 and 1988; he was # 3 in college rankings both years).[3] His .800 won-lost percentage there (40-10) is the 6th-best in the school's history.[8] In 1988, he won the Intercollegiate Tennis Association indoor individual championship. He turned pro in his second year.[3]

The summer of 1989 was his best season as a pro - he won the Chicoutimi challenger event, reached the 3rd round at both the Stratton Mountain and Indianapolis Grand Prix events, the quarter finals of the Canadian Open and Los Angeles Grand Prix tournament, and the 2nd round of the U.S. Open.[9] In July 1989 he defeated world # 24 Jay Berger in Stratton Mountain, 6-2, 2-6, 6-3, in August he beat # 23 Kevin Curren in Montreal, 6-2, 2-6, 6-3, and in September he upset # 8 Tim Mayotte in Los Angeles, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.[9]

In April 1990, Sznajder was a finalist of the Rio de Janeiro Grand Prix event. In November he upset world # 35 Karel Nová?ek 6-4, 6-3, in Brazil.[9]

Upon retiring from the tour, Sznajder worked as Product Manager at PageNet Canada Inc. for 10 years.[10] He then founded his own tennis health and racquet club software company, and directs his own tennis academy ASTA, and GSM Tennis Club, in Kitchener, Ontario.[11][12]

He continued to play competitively, and captured the 2002 Ontario Indoor Championship.[13]

After retiring, Sznajder became a top-ranking competitor on the ITF sanctioned Wilson/Mayfair Senior Circuit Over-35s.[]

In 2002 he was inducted into the Canada Tennis Hall of Fame.[14]

Olympics

Sznajder represented Canada at the 1992 Summer Olympics, reaching the 2nd round.[7]

Davis Cup

As a Canada Davis Cup team competitor, he had a career win-lose record of 14-10, all in singles, including a win and a loss in a losing tie to Spain in the first round of the 1991 World Group. It was Canada's first appearance in the World Group.[8]

ATP career finals

Singles: 1 (1 runner-up)

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0-0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0-0)
ATP Masters Series (0-0)
ATP Championship Series (0-0)
ATP World Series (0-1)
Titles by surface
Hard (0-0)
Clay (0-0)
Grass (0-0)
Carpet (0-1)
Titles by setting
Outdoor (0-0)
Indoor (0-1)
Result W-L Date Tournament Tier Surface Opponent Score
Loss 0-1 Apr 1990 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil World Series Carpet Brazil Luiz Mattar 4-6, 4-6

ATP Challenger and ITF Futures finals

Singles: 4 (1-3)

Legend
ATP Challenger (1-3)
ITF Futures (0-0)
Finals by surface
Hard (0-2)
Clay (1-1)
Grass (0-0)
Carpet (0-0)
Result W-L Date Tournament Tier Surface Opponent Score
Win 1-0 Jul 1989 Chicoutimi, Canada Challenger Clay Germany Karsten Braasch 7-6, 1-6, 6-1
Loss 1-1 Sep 1992 Bogota, Colombia Challenger Clay Spain Daniel Marco 6-7, 6-3, 4-6
Loss 1-2 Oct 1992 Ixtapa, Mexico Challenger Hard Mexico Luis Herrera 1-6, 2-6
Loss 1-3 Oct 1992 Caracas, Venezuela Challenger Hard Czech Republic Daniel Vacek 6-7, 4-6

Doubles: 1 (1-0)

Legend
ATP Challenger (1-0)
ITF Futures (0-0)
Finals by surface
Hard (0-0)
Clay (0-0)
Grass (0-0)
Carpet (1-0)
Result W-L Date Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Win 1-0 Aug 1990 Brasilia, Brazil Challenger Carpet Brazil Jaime Oncins Brazil Luiz Mattar
Brazil Fernando Roese
7-5, 3-6, 7-6

Performance timeline

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# DNQ A NH
(W) winner; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (DNQ) did not qualify; (A) absent; (NH) not held; (SR) strike rate (events won / competed); (W-L) win-loss record.

Singles

Tournament 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 SR W-L Win %
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open A A A A 2R 1R Q1 A Q1 A 0 / 2 1-2 33%
French Open A A A 2R 2R 1R A A A Q1 0 / 3 2-3 40%
Wimbledon A A A A A A A Q3 A A 0 / 0 0-0  - 
US Open A 1R A 2R 1R A 1R Q3 Q3 Q3 0 / 4 1-4 20%
Win-loss 0-0 0-1 0-0 2-2 2-3 0-2 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 / 9 4-9 31%
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells A A A A A A A Q1 Q3 A 0 / 0 0-0  - 
Miami A A A 3R 1R 1R A A Q1 A 0 / 3 2-3 40%
Rome A A A A 1R A A A A A 0 / 1 0-1 0%
Canada 1R 3R 2R QF 3R 1R 1R 1R A 1R 0 / 9 8-9 47%
Cincinnati A A A A 3R A A A Q2 A 0 / 1 2-1 67%
Win-loss 0-1 2-1 1-1 5-2 4-4 0-2 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 / 14 12-14 46%

See also

References

  1. ^ "Kelly: The man who built Milos Raonic's tennis game". thestar.com. 13 February 2011.
  2. ^ "Eugenie Bouchard: from Waterloo to Wimbledon". therecord.com. 2 July 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d "Andrew Sznajder | Bio | ATP Tour | Tennis". ATP Tour.
  4. ^ "Andrew SZNAJDER "
  5. ^ Wechsler, Bob (2008). Day by Day in Jewish Sports History. Jersey City: KTAV Publishing House. p. 258. ISBN 978-0-88125-969-8.
  6. ^ Encyclopaedia Judaica Year Book. Encyclopaedia Judaica. 1983.
  7. ^ a b c Hicks, J. (16 March 2012). "My Passion is Tennis". The Record. Metroland News. Archived from the original on 6 June 2013.
  8. ^ a b "Player profile - Andrew SZNAJDER (CAN)". Davis Cup. Retrieved 2011.
  9. ^ a b c "Andrew Sznajder | Overview | ATP Tour | Tennis". ATP Tour.
  10. ^ "Pagenet".
  11. ^ "AS Group of Companies". 27 September 2007. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007.
  12. ^ "New ventures: Tennis club; reflexology clinic". therecord.com. 11 November 2015.
  13. ^ "Andrew Sznajder," GPTCA.
  14. ^ Wechsler, Bob (2008). Day by Day in Jewish Sports History. KTAV Publishing House, Inc. ISBN 9780881259698.

External links


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