Gaston Doumergue
Get Gaston Doumergue essential facts below. View Videos or join the Gaston Doumergue discussion. Add Gaston Doumergue to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Gaston Doumergue

Pierre Paul Henri Gaston Doumergue (French pronunciation: ​[?ast dum]; 1 August 1863 in Aigues-Vives, Gard – 18 June 1937 in Aigues-Vives) was a French politician of the Third Republic. He served as President of France from 13 June 1924 to 13 June 1931.

Life

Doumergue, c. 1910-1915

Doumergue came from a Protestant family and was a freemason.[1][2][3] Beginning as a Radical, he turned more towards the political right in his old age. He served as prime minister from 9 December 1913 to 2 June 1914. He held the portfolio for the colonies through the ministries of René Viviani and Aristide Briand until Alexandre Ribot's ministry of March 1917, when he was sent to Russia to persuade Alexander Kerensky's government not to make a separate peace with Germany and Austria-Hungary. He was elected as the 13th French President on 13 June 1924, the only Protestant to hold that office. He served until 13 June 1931 and again was Prime Minister in a conservative national unity government, after the riots of 6 February 1934. That government lasted from 6 February to 8 November 1934.

He was widely regarded as one of the most popular French presidents, particularly after the controversial Alexandre Millerand, who had been his predecessor. Doumergue was single when he was elected and became the first President of France to marry in office.[4]

Doumergue's First Ministry, 9 December 1913 - 9 June 1914

Changes

Doumergue's Second Ministry, 9 February - 8 November 1934

Time cover, 21 Jul 1924

Changes

  • 13 October 1934 - Pierre Laval succeeds Barthou (assassinated 9 October) as Minister of Foreign Affairs. Paul Marchandeau succeeds Sarraut as Minister of the Interior. Louis Rollin succeeds Laval as Minister of Colonies.
  • 15 October 1934 - Henri Lémery succeeds Chéron as Minister of Justice.

See also

References

  1. ^ Dictionnaire universelle de la Franc-Maçonnerie (Marc de Jode, Monique Cara and Jean-Marc Cara, ed. Larousse , 2011)
  2. ^ Dictionnaire de la Franc-Maçonnerie (Daniel Ligou, Presses Universitaires de France, 2006)
  3. ^ Ce que la France doit aux francs-maçons (Laurent KUPFERMAN,Emmanuel PIERRA, ed. Grund, 2012)
  4. ^ Sciolino, Elaine (3 February 2008). "French Leader and Ex-Model Wed in Quiet Ceremony". New York Times. Retrieved 2008.

External links

Media related to Gaston Doumergue at Wikimedia Commons

Political offices
Preceded by
Albert Decrais
Minister of Colonies
1902-1905
Succeeded by
Étienne Clémentel
New office Minister of Labour
1906
Succeeded by
René Viviani
Preceded by
Georges Trouillot
Minister of Commerce and Industry
1906-1908
Succeeded by
Jean Cruppi
Preceded by
Aristide Briand
Minister of Public Instruction and Fine Arts
1908-1910
Succeeded by
Maurice Faure
Preceded by
Louis Barthou
Prime Minister of France
1913-1914
Succeeded by
Alexandre Ribot
Preceded by
Stéphen Pichon
Minister of Foreign Affairs
1913-1914
Succeeded by
Léon Bourgeois
Preceded by
René Viviani
Minister of Foreign Affairs
1914
Succeeded by
Théophile Delcassé
Preceded by
Maurice Raynaud
Minister of Colonies
1914-1917
Succeeded by
André Maginot
Preceded by
Léon Bourgeois
President of the Senate
1923-1924
Succeeded by
Justin de Selves
Preceded by
Alexandre Millerand
President of France
1924-1931
Succeeded by
Paul Doumer
Preceded by
Édouard Daladier
Prime Minister of France
1934
Succeeded by
Pierre Étienne Flandin
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Alexandre Millerand
Co-Prince of Andorra
1924-1931
Served alongside: Justí Guitart i Vilardebó
Succeeded by
Paul Doumer
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Alexey Rykov
Cover of Time Magazine
21 July 1924
Succeeded by
William Sproule

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Gaston_Doumergue
 



 



 
Music Scenes