Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Awards
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Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Awards

Ockham New Zealand Book Awards
Date1996 (1996)
CountryNew Zealand
Presented byNew Zealand Book Awards Trust
WebsiteOfficial website

The Ockham New Zealand Book Awards are literary awards presented annually in New Zealand. The awards began in 1996 as the merger of two literary awards events: the New Zealand Book Awards, which ran from 1976 to 1995, and the Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Awards, which ran from 1968 to 1995 (known as the Montana Book Awards from 1994 to 1995).[1][2][3]

The awards have changed name several times depending on sponsorship. From 1996 to 2009, the awards were known as the Montana New Zealand Book Awards, and sponsored by Montana Wines.[3] From 2010 until 2014, the awards were known as the New Zealand Post Book Awards.[2] Since 2015, the main sponsors have been property developer Ockham Residential, the Acorn Foundation, Creative New Zealand, Mary and Peter Biggs, Booksellers Aotearoa New Zealand and biotech company MitoQ.[4] The awards event is the opening event of the Auckland Writers Festival, held annually in May.[5]

History and format

Before 1996 there were two major New Zealand literary awards events: the Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Awards (1968 to 1995, known as the Montana Book Awards from 1994 to 1995) and the New Zealand Book Awards (1976 to 1995).

The Wattie Book of the Year Award (named for Sir James Wattie) was formed in 1968, supported by the New Zealand Publishers Association and sponsored by the company Wattie's. This award was the first of its kind in New Zealand.[1][6] The first recipients were John Morton and Michael Miller for The New Zealand Sea Shore.[6] The first novel to win an award was Smith's Dream by C.K. Stead in 1972.[7] The award became the Goodman Fielder Wattie Awards, and only had a single category covering fiction, non-fiction and other genres.[6][8] In 1994 the winemaking company Montana became the sponsor and the awards were renamed to the Montana Book Awards.[2]

The New Zealand Book Awards were set up by the New Zealand Literary Fund, a government organisation, in 1976. Annual awards were presented for literary merit in fiction, non-fiction, poetry and (later) book production.[6]

In 1996, the two award series were amalgamated to form the Montana New Zealand Book Awards, managed by Booksellers New Zealand (a bookselling association) and offering prizes in six categories.[1][6] In 2010, the New Zealand Post took over as sponsor, having supported the New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults for the previous 14 years.[2][6]

In 2015, Auckland property development firm Ockham Residential assumed sponsorship of the awards, and the New Zealand Book Awards Trust took over the governance and management. No prizes were presented in that year, and the awards were streamlined to discontinue the Book of the Year Award, the Booksellers' Choice Award and the People's Choice Award. Since the first Ockham New Zealand Book Awards in 2016, the ceremony has been held each year in May, as part of the Auckland Writers Festival.[2] In 2020 the award winners were announced in a virtual presentation, after the Auckland Writers Festival was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[5]

As of 2021, there are five principal prizes: fiction (currently known as the Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction), general non-fiction (sponsored by Royal Society Te Ap?rangi), illustrated non-fiction, poetry (currently known as the Mary and Peter Biggs Award for Poetry) and Te M?rau o te Tuhi M?ori Language Award for books written entirely in te reo M?ori. "Best First Book" prizes are awarded to first time authors in the first four categories, currently sponsored by MitoQ.[5] Each category is judged by a panel of three judges. Winners of the Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction receive a minimum of NZ$55,000, and is the largest cash book prize in New Zealand.[9] The other principal prizewinners receive NZ$10,000 each, and the winners of the four MitoQ Best First Book awards receive NZ$2,500.[5]

Fiction

Fiction award

Since 2020, the top prize for fiction has been the Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction. Between 2017 and 2019, the top prize for fiction was known as the Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize. In 2017, it was known as the Acorn Foundation Literary Award. From 1996 to 2016, it was known as the Fiction Prize.

Best first book award (fiction)

Since 2018, this award has been known as the MitoQ Best First Book Awards: Hubert Church Prize for Fiction. Between 2015 and 2018, this award was known as the Hubert Church Best First Book Award for Fiction. From 1997 to 2014, this award was known as the NZSA Hubert Church Best First Book of Fiction Prize. In 1996, this award was known as the Best First Book Award, Fiction. Prior to 1996, this award had been presented since 1945 by PEN NZ, and was named for the poet, novelist and critic Hubert Church.[40]


Poetry

Poetry award

Since 2020, this award has been the Mary and Peter Biggs Award for Poetry. Before 2019, this award was known as the Poetry Award.

Best first book award (poetry)

Since 2018, this award has been the MitoQ Best First Book Awards: Jessie Mackay Prize for Poetry. Between 2015 and 2018, this award was known as the Jessie Mackay Best First Book Award for Poetry. From 1997 to 2014, this award was known as the NZSA Jessie Mackay Best First Book of Poetry Prize. In 1996, this award was known as the Best First Book Award, Poetry. Prior to 1996, this award had been presented since 1940 by PEN NZ, and was named for Jessie Mackay, New Zealand's first local-born poet.[40]

General non-fiction

General non-fiction award

Since 2020, the top prize for general non-fiction has been the General Non-Fiction Award. Between 2016 and 2019, this award was known as the Royal Society Te Ap?rangi Award. Between 2010 and 2015, this award was known as the General Non-Fiction Prize. Between 1998 and 2009, the top prize for non-fiction was the Montana Medal for Non-Fiction. There was no top prize for general non-fiction in 1996 or 1997.

Best first book award (general non-fiction)

Since 2019, this award has been known as the MitoQ Best First Book Awards: E H McCormick Prize for General Non-Fiction. Between 2015 and 2018, this award was known as the E H McCormick Best First Book Award for General Non-Fiction. From 1997 to 2014, this award was known as the NZSA E.H. McCormick Best First Book of Non-Fiction Prize. In 1996, this award was known as the Best First Book Award, Non-Fiction. The award is named for New Zealand historian and biographer Eric Hall McCormick.[40]

Illustrated non-fiction

Illustrated non-fiction award

Since 2004, this award has been known as the Illustrated Non-Fiction Award. From 1996 to 2003, this award was known as the Illustrative Arts Award.

Best first book award (illustrated non-fiction)

Since 2020, this award has been the MitoQ Best First Book Awards: Judith Binney Prize for Illustrated Non-Fiction. From 2016 to 2019, this award was known as the Judith Binney Best First Book Award for Illustrated Non-Fiction. The award is named after the New Zealand historian Judith Binney.[40]

M?ori Language Award

Books that meet the general criteria of the fiction, non-fiction and poetry awards and are written wholly and originally in te reo M?ori are eligible for Te M?rau o te Tuhi - M?ori Language Award. This award is made at the discretion of a specially appointed judge.[5] Prior to 2019, M?ori language awards were presented in 2008, 2009, 2012 and 2013.

Discontinued awards

Top awards

Book of the year

There have been a number of "book of the year" awards in the history of the awards. The New Zealand Post Book of the Year was presented between 2010 and 2014, when New Zealand Post was the sponsor of the awards ceremony. The Montana Medal for Fiction or Poetry was presented in 2008 and 2009. The Deutz Medal for Fiction or Poetry was presented between 1998 and 2007. The Book of the Year/Cultural Heritage Award was presented in 1996 and 1997.

People's choice award

The People's Choice Award was presented from 2010 to 2014. Before 2010, this award was known as the Readers' Choice Award. There were no people's choice awards in 1996 or 1997.

Booksellers' choice award

The Nielsen Booksellers' Choice Award was only presented in 2013 and 2014.

  • 2014 - Harry Broad & Rob Suisted, Molesworth: Stories from New Zealand's largest high country station. Craig Potton Publishing[21]
  • 2013 - Shaun Barnett, Rob Brown & Geoff Spearpoint, Shelter from the Storm: The story of New Zealand's backcountry huts. Craig Potton Publishing[22]

Lifetime achievement award

The A W Reed Award for Contribution to New Zealand Literature Award was presented in 2004. From 2000 to 2002 this award was known as the A W Reed Lifetime Achievement Award.

Non-fiction category awards

History

This award ended in 2009. Before 2001, a single award was given for History and Biography.

Biography

This award ended in 2009. Before 2001, a single award was given for History and Biography.

Environment

The Environment award ended in 2009. From 1998 to 1999, this award was titled the Environment & Heritage Award. From 1996 to 1997, this award was titled the Natural Heritage Award.

Lifestyle & Contemporary Culture

The Lifestyle & Contemporary Choice award ended in 2009. From 2000 to 2001, this award was the Lifestyle Award. From 1998 to 1999, this award was the Lives & Lifestyle Award. From 1996 to 1997, this award was the Leisure & Lifestyle Award.

Reference and Anthology

The Reference and Anthology award was presented between 2002 and 2009.

Fiction runner up and Honour Awards

Fiction runner up

An award for the runner-up(s) in the Fiction category was presented from 2000 to 2009.[44]

Honour Award

  • 2002 - Te Onehou Phillis, Eruera Manuera. Huia Publishers[33]
  • 1997 (fiction) - Maurice Shadbolt, Dove on the Waters. David Ling[38]
  • 1997 (poetry) - J. C. Sturm, Dedications. Steele Roberts[38]
  • 1996 - Pei Te Hurinui Jones, translated by Bruce Biggs, Nga Iwi o Tainui: The Traditional History of the Tainui People - Nga Koorero Tuku o Nga Tuupuna. Auckland University Press

Other awards

BPANZ Review Page or Programme Award

This award ended in 2009. Before 2006, this award was known as the Review Pages/Section of the Year Award.

BPANZ Reviewer of the Year Award

This award ended in 2009. Before 2006, this award was known as the Reviewer of the Year.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Hamilton, Stephen (1997). "Recognition, and rewards of success". Book & Print in New Zealand : A Guide to Print Culture in Aotearoa. Wellington, NZ: Victoria University Press. ISBN 0-86473-331-3. Retrieved 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d e "History of the New Zealand Book Awards". Christchurch City Libraries. Retrieved 2021.
  3. ^ a b Gibson, Nevil (11 May 2009). "Montana Wines ends 15-year stint as book award sponsors". The National Business Review. Archived from the original on 23 June 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  4. ^ "About Our Funders". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d e "About the Awards". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Derby, Mark. "Page 2. Literary awards, 1950s onwards". Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 2021.
  7. ^ Thomson, Margie (17 July 2002). "Judgment day for the Montana Book Awards". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 2021.
  8. ^ Wevers, Lydia. "New Zealand fiction award winners, 1972-2020". Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 2021.
  9. ^ McClure, Tess (12 May 2021). "Airini Beautrais wins New Zealand's Ockham fiction prize for short story collection Bug Week". The Guardian. Retrieved 2021.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Beautrais wins 2021 Ockham New Zealand Book Award for fiction". Books+Publishing. 13 May 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  11. ^ "Manawatu wins New Zealand Book Award for fiction". Books+Publishing. 13 May 2020. Retrieved 2020.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h "Past Winners: 2020". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  13. ^ Brookes, Emily (19 May 2019). "Ockham Book Awards winners of their time, and also today". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 2019.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Past Winners: 2019". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  15. ^ "Wellingtonian Pip Adam wins Ockham New Zealand Book Award for The New Animals". Stuff. 15 May 2018. Retrieved 2019.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h "Past Winners: 2018". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  17. ^ "Ockham NZ Book Awards: Catherine Chidgey, Victoria University Press the big winners". Stuff. 16 May 2017. Retrieved 2019.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h "Past Winners: 2017". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  19. ^ Black, Eleanor (10 May 2016). "Stephen Daisley wins $50,000 fiction prize at Ockham NZ Book Awards". Stuff. Retrieved 2019.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h "Past Winners: 2016". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Past Winners: 2014". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Past Winners: 2013". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Past Winners: 2012". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Past Winners: 2011". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Past Winners: 2010". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Past Winners: 2009". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Past Winners: 2008". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Past Winners: 2007". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Past Winners: 2006". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Past Winners: 2005". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Past Winners: 2004". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Past Winners: 2003". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Past Winners: 2002". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Past Winners: 2001". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Past Winners: 2000". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Past Winners: 1999". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Past Winners: 1998". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Past Winners: 1997". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  39. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Past Winners: 1996". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Retrieved 2021.
  40. ^ a b c d "Winners: 2021 Awards". New Zealand Book Awards Trust. Archived from the original on 12 May 2021. Retrieved 2021.
  41. ^ "Welly writer wins book award". Stuff.co.nz. 29 August 2013. Retrieved 2019.
  42. ^ "Native tree book wins nation's top honours". The New Zealand Herald. 1 August 2012. ISSN 1170-0777. Retrieved 2019.
  43. ^ "Allen Curnow, poet and dramatist, dead". New Zealand Herald. 24 September 2001. Retrieved 2021.
  44. ^ "Montana New Zealand Book Awards". Christchurch City Libraries. Retrieved 2021.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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