Hadhabani
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Hadhabani

Hadhabani (also: Hadhbani) (Kurdish: ,Hecbanî‎) was a large medieval Sunni Muslim Kurdish tribe divided into several groups, centered at Arbil, Ushnu and Urmia. Their dominion included surrounding areas of Maragha and Urmia to the east, Salmas to the north and parts of Arbil and Mosul to the west ruling between the year 906 to 1080.

Hadhabani
CountryMiddle East
FounderMuhammad
Final rulerAn-Nasir Yusuf (Syria) Al-Ashraf Musa (Egypt)
Cadet branchesAyyubid Dynasty

About 10th century they gradually immigrated northward to the areas around lake Urmia with Ushnu as their summer capital. They ruled the area for a while but later split to a few branches who spread across Azerbaijan, and Caucasus. Saladin, the renowned Kurdish Muslim ruler was descendant of one of the Hadhabani branches.[1][2]

Rulers

  • Muhammad son of Bilal, around 906 came in conflicts with Abbasids, eventually retired to Azarbaijan.
  • Jafar son of Shakkoya around 943, Salmas,
  • Mir Abu Hija Musk son of Chako
  • Abu Hidja son of Rabib al Dawla c. 1040 Urmia,
  • Mir Sharraf al-Din Isa son of Musk c. 1045
  • Mir Salar son of Musa c. 1046
  • Mir Abul Hasan Ali son of Musk c. 1046-48
  • Mir Abu Ali al al-Hasan son of Musk 1048-63
  • Mir Abu Hija II, Husain son of Abi Ali Al-Hasan 1063-1080

See also

References

  1. ^ Page 23: "Salah ed-Din (Saladin) was the son of Ayûb, and grandson of Shadi, a Rawadiya Kurd of the great Hadâniya Tribe. He was thus of Kurd descent. Several of his bravest warriors and most trusted counsellors were Kurds, and during his reign, and that of his brother el'Adel, Kurds ruled in Armenia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, and Arabia." https://archive.org/details/lifesaladin00condgoog/page/n22/mode/2up
  2. ^ Bosworth, Clifford Edmund (1996). The New Islamic Dynasties: A Chronological and Genealogical Manual. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. p. 73. ISBN 0-7486-0684-X.


External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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