Jasenovac, Sisak-Moslavina County
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Jasenovac, Sisak-Moslavina County
Jasenovac
Op?ina Jasenovac
Municipality of Jasenovac
Monastery Jasenovac
Monastery Jasenovac
Jasenovac is located in Croatia
Jasenovac
Jasenovac
Location of Jasenovac in Croatia
Coordinates: 45°16?N 16°55?E / 45.267°N 16.917°E / 45.267; 16.917
Country Croatia
CountyFlag of Sisak-Moslavina County.png Sisak-Moslavina
Government
 o MayorMarija Ma?kovi? (HDZ)
Area
 o Total161.88 km2 (62.50 sq mi)
Population
(2011)
 o Total1,997
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 o Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)

Jasenovac (Croatian pronunciation: [jas?no?at?s]) is a village and a municipality in Croatia, in the southern part of the Sisak-Moslavina County at the confluence of the river Una into Sava. The name means "ash wood" or "ash forest" in Croatian, the area being ringed by such a forest. During the World War II, it was the site of the Jasenovac concentration camp.

Image of Jasenovac Municipality within Sisak-Moslavina County

Demographics

In 1991, the total population was 3,599, Croats made up 2,419 (67.21%), while Serbs were noticeable population with 911 (25.31%). In 2001, the municipality's population was 2,391, composed of 2,179 (91%) Croats and 141 Serbs (5.90%).

In 2011, the total population was 1,997, with 1,807 (90.49%) Croats and 152 Serbs (7.61%).[2]

The municipality of Jasenovac consists of 10 villages:

Austro-Hungarian 1910 census

According to the last Austro-Hungarian 1910 census, municipality of Jasenovac had 8,773 inhabitants which were ethnically and religiously declared as follows:[3]

Population by ethnicity Total Croats Serbs Germans Czechs Hungarians Italians Ruthenians Slovenes Note[4]
Drenov Bok 922 919 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 It consisted of two hamlets: Bumbekova?a (pop. 9) and Drenov Bok (pop. 913).
Jasenovac 2,365 1,338 975 33 8 8 0 2 1 It consisted of two hamlets: Jasenovac (pop. 2,327) and Lon?arice (pop. 38).
Ko?utarica 802 801 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Krapje 1,080 1,072 3 1 2 0 1 0 1
Mlaka 1,176 37 1,138 1 0 0 0 0 0 It consisted of two independent settlements: Mlaka (pop. 823) and Jablanac Jasenova?ki (pop. 353) with two hamlets: Jablanac Jasenova?ki (pop. 350) and Jasenova?ki Strug (pop. 3).
Puska 832 797 29 0 0 0 6 0 0 Together with a settlement of Trebe?.
Tanac 182 173 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 At the time of Census it was hamlet of the settlement of U?tica. Independent settlement from 1948.
Trebe? 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 It was a hamlet of the settlement of Puska from 1948 as Trebe? Krapjanski, and from 1953-1981 as Trebe? Puanski. Independent settlement from 1981. For Census data see: Puska.
U?tica 1,194 492 702 0 0 0 0 0 0 It consisted of three hamlets: Klenov Bok (pop. 7), U?tica (pop. 1,077) and U?ti?ka Gradina (pop. 110).
Vi?njica 180 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 At the time of Census it was hamlet of the settlement of U?tica as Vi?njica U?ti?ka. Independent settlement from 1948.
Total 8,733 5,809 (66.51%) 2,859 (32.73%) 35 (0.40%) 10 (0.11%) 9 (0.10%) 7 (0.08%) 2 (0.02%) 2 (0.02%)
Population by religion Total Roman Catholics Eastern Orthodox Jews Eastern Catholics
Drenov Bok 922 919 3 0 0
Jasenovac 2,365 1,380 979 4 2
Ko?utarica 802 801 0 0 1
Krapje 1,080 1,074 3 3 0
Mlaka 1,176 38 1,138 0 0
Puska 832 803 29 0 0
Tanac 182 173 9 0 0
Trebe? 0 0 0 0 0
U?tica 1,194 489 702 3 0
Vi?njica 180 180 0 0 0
Total 8,733 5,857 (67.06%) 2,863 (32.78%) 10 (0.11%) 3 (0.03%)

Note: 1910 census was based on language and religion, without question about ethnicity. Croatian and Serbian language were presented as one language: Croatian or Serbian. Croat and Serb ethnicity here is based on religion. Roman Catholics and Eastern Catholics (also Protestants and Jews) which language was Croatian or Serbian are presented as Croats, and Eastern Orthodox which language was Croatian or Serbian are presented as Serbs. Other ethnic groups are presented based on their language. That time Ruthenians presented together modern days ethnicities of Ukrainians and Rusyns. Jews were presented only as religious group.

History

In the late 19th and early 20th century, Jasenovac was part of the Po?ega County of the Kingdom of Croatia and Slavonia.

Jasenovac attained tragic notoriety during the Holocaust through the Jasenovac concentration camp giving its name to the Usta?a complex of WWII concentration camps.

During the Croatian War of Independence, in 1991, Serb forces destroyed the local three-way bridge over the Una and the Sava linking the town to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The area was subsequently mined. During the retreat of 1st Krajina Corps in 1992 from area of Jasenovac looting and burning of Serb houses was recorded and this problem was discussed by regional council of SAO Western Slavonia. While on May 1993 Government of Republic of Serbian Krajina was informed by the local residents that 18 corps of Serbian Army of Krajina which are located in Jasenovac continue with burning of the houses, also they destroyed buildings and documentation of Jasenovac concentration camp.[5] The town was taken over by Croatian forces as part of Operation Flash on 1 May 1995.

In 2005, a new three-way bridge was opened with financing from Croatia and the European Commission.[6] Demining operations in the area were ongoing in 2009.[7]

Jasenovac is underdeveloped municipality which is statistically classified as the First Category Area of Special State Concern by the Government of Croatia.[8]

Culture

Jasenovac is home to a library with over 10,000 items.[9] Jasenovac celebrates May 1, the day of its liberation as part of Operation Flash, as its municipal holiday.[10]

The village of Krapje in the Jasenovac municipality houses the headquarters of the Lonjsko Polje Nature Park: the largest protected wetland in Croatia.[11]

Sport

The municipality is home to the football club NK Jasenovac.

References

  1. ^ "Op?ine na podru?jima posebne dr?avne skrbi Republike Hrvatske" (PDF). Croatian Chamber of Economy. Retrieved 2020.
  2. ^ "Population by Ethnicity, by Towns/Municipalities, 2011 Census: County of Sisak-Moslavina". Census of Population, Households and Dwellings 2011. Zagreb: Croatian Bureau of Statistics. December 2012. Retrieved .
  3. ^ Book: "Ethnic and religious composition of population of Croatia, 1880-1991: by settlements", author: Jakov Gelo, publisher: Zagreb, Croatian bureau of statistics, 1998., ISBN 953-6667-07-X, ISBN 978-953-6667-07-9;
  4. ^ Book: "Settlements and population of Socialist Republic of Croatia 1857-1971", author: Mirko Koren?i?, publisher: Zagreb, Croatian bureau of statistics, 1979.
  5. ^ Janja Sekula Giba?; (2014) Deployment of UNPROFOR and (un)achieved demilitarisation in the occupied territories of Western Slavonia in 1992 p. 300-301 [1]
  6. ^ "Predsjednik Vlade na otvorenju mosta u Jasenovcu". Archived from the original on July 17, 2011.
  7. ^ Novi projekt razminiranja u Op?ini Jasenovac Archived 2011-09-28 at the Wayback Machine [New de-mining project in the Municipality of Jasenovac], Croatian Mine Action Centre, 23 June 2009.
  8. ^ Lovrin?evi?, ?eljko; Davor, Mikuli?; Budak, Jelena (June 2004). "AREAS OF SPECIAL STATE CONCERN IN CROATIA- REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIFFERENCES AND THE DEMOGRAPHIC AND EDUCATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS". Ekonomski pregled, Vol.55 No.5-6. Archived from the original on 2018-08-18. Retrieved 2018.
  9. ^ Desetlje?e rada Narodne knji?nice Jasenovac[permanent dead link], Vjesnik
  10. ^ "Jasenovac: Uz "Bljesak" i Dan op?ine Jasenovca". Archived from the original on 2010-10-28. Retrieved .
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-09-10. Retrieved .CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External links

Coordinates: 45°16?N 16°55?E / 45.267°N 16.917°E / 45.267; 16.917


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Jasenovac,_Sisak-Moslavina_County
 



 



 
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