Kurdish Jews in Israel
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Kurdish Jews in Israel

Kurdish Jews in Israel
Total population
200,000[1][2]
Regions with significant populations
Mainly Jerusalem, also Tel Aviv and many other places.
Languages
Hebrew (Main language for all generations);
Older generation: Kurdish language, Judeo-Aramaic
Religion
Judaism

Kurdish Jews in Israel are immigrants and descendants of the immigrants of the Kurdish Jewish communities, who now reside within the state of Israel. They number between 200,000 to 300,000.[3][4][5]

History

Immigration of Kurdish Jews to the Land of Israel initiated during the late 16th century, with a community of rabbinic scholars arriving to Safed, Galilee, and a Kurdish Jewish quarter had been established there as a result. The thriving period of Safed however ended in 1660, with Druze power struggles in the region and an economic decline.

Since the early 20th century, some Kurdish Jews had been active in the Zionist movement. One of the most famous members of Lehi (Freedom Fighters of Israel) was Moshe Barazani, whose family immigrated from Iraq and settled in Jerusalem in the late 1920s. In 1939, there were 4,369 in Jerusalem, growing to 30,000 in 1972.[6]

The vast majority of Kurdish Jews were forced out by Iraqi authorities, being evacuated to Israel in the early 1950s, together with other Iraqi Jewish community. The vast majority of the Kurdish Jews of Iranian Kurdistan relocated mostly to Israel as well, in the 1950s.[7]

The Times of Israel reported on September 30, 2013: "Today, there are almost 200,000 Kurdish Jews in Israel, about half of whom live in Jerusalem. There are also over 30 agricultural villages throughout the country that were founded by Kurdish Jews."[8] Today, the large majority of the Jews of "Kurdistan" and their descendants live in Israel.

Settlements

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "Kurdish Jewish Community in Israel". Jcjcr.org. Archived from the original on July 28, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  2. ^ Berman, Lazar (September 30, 2013). "Cultural pride, and unlikely guests, at Kurdish Jewish festival". timesofisrael.com.
  3. ^ "Kurdish Jewish Community in Israel". Jcjcr.org. Archived from the original on July 28, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  4. ^ Berman, Lazar (September 30, 2013). "Cultural pride, and unlikely guests, at Kurdish Jewish festival". timesofisrael.com.
  5. ^ "Kurdistan". www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org. Retrieved 2021.
  6. ^ Mamostaye Kurd. "The Kurdish Jews in Transition: From Kurdistan to Israel". Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "Publicity seeking Kurdish official brings back memories of Jewish Kurd aliya fiasco". www.jpost.com.
  8. ^ "Ancient pride, and unlikely guests, at Kurdish Jewish festival". timesofisrael.com.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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