Kurds in Russia
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Kurds in Russia
Kurds in Russia
?
Kurdên Rusyayê ?
Ermakov. No 6997. Kurd in the Russian service. 557
Total population
63,818 (2010)[1]
Regions with significant populations
Khabarovsk, Krasnodar, Kursk[2]
10,000 in Moscow (1995)[3]
Languages
Kurdish (Kurmanji), Russian, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Georgian[4]
Religion
Sunni Islam, Yazidism, Irreligion[5][6]
Related ethnic groups
Iranian people

The Kurds in Russia (Russian: ? , romanizedKurdy v Rossii, Kurdish: Kurdên Rusyayê‎) form a major part of the historically significant Kurdish population in the post-Soviet space, with close ties to the Kurdish communities in the Caucasus and Central Asia. The 2010 Russian census registered a total of 63,818 ethnic Kurds living in Russia.[7]

History

During the early 19th century, the main goal of the Russian Empire was to ensure the neutrality of the Kurds in the wars against Persia and the Ottoman Empire.[8] In the beginning of the 19th century, Kurds settled in Transcaucasia, at a time when Transcaucasia was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the 20th century, Kurds were persecuted and exterminated by the Turks and Persians, a situation that led Kurds to move to Russian Transcaucasia.[4] From 1804-1813 and again in 1826-1828, when the Russian Empire and the Persian Empire were at war, the Russian authorities let Kurds settle in Russia and Armenia.[4] During the Crimean War and the Russo-Turkish War (1877-1878), Kurds moved to Russia and Armenia.[4] According to the Russian Census of 1897, 99,900 Kurds lived in the Russian Empire.[9]

During the World War II, one of the most renowned Soviet Kurds was Samand Siabandov, a war hero.

Abdullah Öcalan sought asylum in Russia in 1998.[2]

Kurdish population in Russia

Statistics
1897[10]
99,949 In the whole Russian Empire
99,836 Russian Transcaucasia
112 Russian Turkestan or Central Asia
1 European Russia
0 Siberia
0 Vistula Land
1926[11]
54,661 Soviet Union
52,173 Transcaucasian SFSR
2,308 Turkmen SSR
178 Russian SFSR
1 Ukrainian SSR
1 Uzbek SSR
0 Belarusian SSR
1939[12]
45,877 Soviet Union
20,481 Armenian SSR
12,915 Georgian SSR
6,005 Azerbaijan SSR
2,387 Kazakh SSR
1,954 Turkmen SSR
1,490 Kyrgyz SSR
387 Russian SFSR
156 Uzbek SSR
90 Ukrainian SSR
7 Tajikistan SSR
5 Belarusian SSR
1959[13]
58,799 Soviet Union
25,627 Armenian SSR
16,212 Georgian SSR
6,109 Kazakh SSR
4,783 Kyrgyz SSR
2,263 Turkmenistan SSR
1,487 Azerbaijan SSR
1,354 Uzbekistan SSR
855 Russian SSR
65 Ukrainian SSR
15 Tajikistan SSR
10 Belarusian SSR
9 Moldovan SSR
4 Lithuanian SSR
3 Estonian SSR
3 Latvian SSR
1979[14]
115,858 Soviet Union
50,822 Armenian SSR
25,688 Georgian SSR
17,692 Kazakh SSR
9,544 Kyrgyz SSR
5,676 Azerbaijan SSR
3,521 Turkmenistan SSR
1.631 Russian SSR
982 Uzbekistan SSR
122 Ukrainian SSR
117 Belarusian SSR
27 Tajikistan SSR
15 Moldovan SSR
10 Latvian SSR
9 Lithuanian SSR
2 Estonian SSR
1989[15]
152,717 Soviet Union
56,127 Armenian SSR
33,331 Georgian SSR
25,425 Kazakh SSR
14,262 Kyrgyz SSR
12,226 Azerbaijan SSR
4,724 Russian SSR
4,387 Turkmenistan SSR
1,839 Uzbekistan SSR
238 Ukrainian SSR
66 Belarusian SSR
56 Tajikistan SSR
13 Estonian SSR
11 Latvian SSR
9 Moldovan SSR
3 Lithuanian SSR
Year Population Note
2002 50.880[16] In the Russian Federation
2010 63.818[1] In the Russian Federation
Federal subjects Kurds (2002 census)[17]
 Krasnodar Krai 9.463
 Adygea 3.687
 Stavropol Krai 3.676
 Saratov Oblast 3.210
 Nizhny Novgorod Oblast 3.158
 Yaroslavl Oblast 2.754
 Moscow 2.338
 Rostov Oblast 2.193
 Novosibirsk Oblast 2.099
 Tambov Oblast 1.712
 Volgograd Oblast 1.544
 Sverdlovsk Oblast 1.152
 Oryol Oblast 953
 Moscow Oblast 788
 Tula Oblast 786
 Kursk Oblast 761
 Bashkortostan 755
 Lipetsk Oblast 717
 Samara Oblast 700
 Voronezh Oblast 645
 Kaliningrad Oblast 549
 Tyumen Oblast 414
 Saint Petersburg 384
 Chelyabinsk Oblast 362
 Belgorod Oblast 342
 Irkutsk Oblast 325
 Kabardino-Balkaria 306
 Tver Oblast 290
 Kurgan Oblast 271
 Krasnoyarsk Krai 268
 Omsk Oblast 257
 Ivanovo Oblast 239
 Kostroma Oblast 207
 Ulyanovsk Oblast 206
 Kalmykia 202
 Vladimir Oblast 195
 Primorsky Krai 188
 Orenburg Oblast 185
 Ryazan Oblast 167
 Kemerovo Oblast 162
 Bryansk Oblast 139
 Penza Oblast 139
 Tomsk Oblast 139
 Kaluga Oblast 138
 Astrakhan Oblast 120
 Tatarstan 104
 North Ossetia-Alania 103
 Karachay-Cherkessia 98
 Leningrad Oblast 97
 Udmurtia 86
 Mordovia 76
 Smolensk Oblast 71
 Kirov Oblast 70
 Perm Krai 61
 Vologda Oblast 56
 Dagestan 54
 Chuvashia 53
 Sakha Republic 53
 Altai Krai 51
 Murmansk Oblast 47
 Novgorod Oblast 44
 Kamchatka Krai 40
 Amur Oblast 38
 Arkhangelsk Oblast 35
 Pskov Oblast 24
 Buryatia 23
 Komi 18
 Khakassia 16
 Chechnya 12
 Karelia 11
 Ingushetia 9
 Jewish Autonomous Oblast 9
 Khabarovsk Krai 9
 Sakhalin Oblast 8
 Chita Oblast 6
 Tuva 3
 Mari El 2
 Altai Republic 1
 Magadan Oblast 1

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "? 2010 ?. ? ". Demoscope. Demoscope. Archived from the original on 30 May 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  2. ^ a b "Relations With Russia Deteriorate As Kurds Protest". The Russia Journal. The Russia Journal. Archived from the original on 26 January 2016. Retrieved 2012.
  3. ^ "The Kurds remain caught in the "Transcaucasian Triangle"". jamestown.org. 19 May 1995. Archived from the original on 29 January 2016. Retrieved 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d "The Kurds of Caucasia and Central Asia have been cut off for a considerable period of time and their development in Russia and then in the Soviet Union has been somewhat different. In this light the Soviet Kurds may be considered to be an ethnic group in their own right." The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire "Kurds". Institute of Estonia (EKI). Institute of Estonia (EKI). Retrieved 2012.
  5. ^ "? 2010 ?. ? ". Archived from the original on 2012-05-30.
  6. ^ "Kurdistan: between U.S. and Iraq". Georgiatimes. Georgiatimes. Archived from the original on 27 January 2016. Retrieved 2012.
  7. ^ 4 - " ? ?, ".. perepis2002.ru (in Russian). perepis2002.ru. Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 2012.
  8. ^ "Archived copy" ? . rau.su (in Russian). rau.su. Archived from the original on 12 February 2012. Retrieved 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "Chapter 10: The Kurds in the Soviet Union". Ismet Chériff Vanly. scribd. Retrieved 2012.
  10. ^ " ? ? 1897 ?. ? ? , ? ". Demoscope. Retrieved 2017.
  11. ^ ? 1926 ?. ? (in Russian). Retrieved 2012.
  12. ^ "? 1939 ?. ?". Demoscope.ru. Retrieved 2012.
  13. ^ "? 1959 ?. ?". Demoscope.ru. Retrieved 2012.
  14. ^ "? 1970 ?. ?". Demoscope.ru. Retrieved 2012.
  15. ^ "? 1989 ?. ?". Demoscope.ru. Retrieved 2012.
  16. ^ "4. National composition of population and citizenship: 4.3. Population by nationalities and knowledge of Russian". Retrieved 2012.
  17. ^ "National Composition of Population for Regions of the Russian Federation" (in Russian). perepis2002.ru. Retrieved 2013.

External links


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