Kurds in Ukraine
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Kurds in Ukraine
Kurds in Ukraine
? ?
Kurdên Ûkraynayê
Total population
2,088 (2001 census)[1]-25,000 (2004 estimation)[2]
Regions with significant populations
Crimea, Luhansk Oblast, Kherson Oblast, Kyvi Oblast, Kyiv city[1]
Languages
Kurdish (Kurmanji), Ukrainian, Russian[1]
Religion
Islam, Yezidism[3][4]

The Kurds in Ukraine (Ukrainian: ? ?, romanizedKurdy v Ukrayini, Kurdish: Kurdên Ûkraynayê‎) form a part of the historically significant Kurdish population in the post-Soviet space, and are located mainly in the southern and eastern parts of the country. They descend from migrants and refugees from the Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) and have had a presence in Ukraine since the early 20th century.[2][1]

History

The sharp population rise from 1989 to 2001, where the Kurdish population augmented from 238 to 2,088 was caused by the Spitak earthquake which shook the Kurdish areas of Armenia in 1988. Furthermore, the fall of the Soviet Union facilitated the migration of Kurds from the former Soviet Union to Ukraine. Most of these Kurds were from the Yezidi minority. Another wave of refugees came to Ukraine as a consequence of the first Nagorno-Karabakh War in 1993, which occurred in the region which was historically known as Red Kurdistan. This wave of migration included both Muslim and Yezidi Kurds.[4]

Census results
Year[1] Kurdish Population
1897 0[5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13]
1926 161
1939 901
1959 65
1970 117
1979 122
1989 238
2001 2,088
1Note: Includes Crimea which became part of Ukraine in 1954.
Kurds in oblasts of Ukraine by population (2001)[14][15]

Language

In the 1989 Soviet Census, out of the 238 ethnic Kurds in Ukraine, 132 of them (55.5%) had Kurdish as first language, while 77 (32.3%) had Russian and 13 (5.5%) had Ukrainian.[16] The numbers for Kurdish and Ukrainian rose to 56% and 11% respectively in 2001.[14]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Kurdstat - Ukraine". kurdstat.com. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ a b Sergey Grabovsky (13 August 2004). "" ?-? ?"? ? ?". Radio Svoboda (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 2019.
  3. ^ Khana Omarkhali. "On the Structure of the Yezidi Clan and Tribal System and its Terminology among the Yezidis of the Caucasus". The Journal of Kurdish Studies. VI: 104-119.
  4. ^ a b ?. ?. (2011). " ? ( )". ?. 53-54: 86-101.
  5. ^ "Demoscope - Kiev governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ "Demoscope - Podolia governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "Demoscope - Poltava governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  8. ^ "Demoscope - Kharkov governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ "Demoscope - Kherson governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  10. ^ "Demoscope - Chernigov governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  11. ^ "Demoscope - Volhynia governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ "Demoscope - Yekaterinoslav". Retrieved 2019.
  13. ^ "Demoscope - Taurida governorate". Retrieved 2019.
  14. ^ a b "The distribution of the population by nationality and mother tongue". Statistics of Ukraine. Retrieved 2019.
  15. ^ "Distribution of the population by nationality and native language (2,3)". Retrieved 2019.
  16. ^ , (20 May 2016). "? ? ? " ?"". Studia Ukrainica Posnaniensia. p. 69. Retrieved 2019. (?) - , , , , , ?

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