Luliang Airport
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Luliang Airport
Lüliang Dawu Airport
Summary
Airport typePublic
ServesLüliang, Shanxi, China
LocationDawu, Fangshan County
Opened26 January 2014
Coordinates37°41?00?N 111°08?34?E / 37.68333°N 111.14278°E / 37.68333; 111.14278Coordinates: 37°41?00?N 111°08?34?E / 37.68333°N 111.14278°E / 37.68333; 111.14278
Map
LLV is located in Shanxi
LLV
LLV
Location of airport in Shanxi
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
18/36 2,600 8,530
Source:[1][2][3]
Lüliang Dawu Airport
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese

Lüliang Dawu Airport (IATA: LLV, ICAO: ZBLL) is an airport serving the city of Lüliang in Shanxi Province, China. It is located near the town of Dawu in Fangshan County, 20.5 kilometers from the city center. Construction of the airport began on 21 February 2009 with an investment of 764 million yuan, and was originally projected to be finished in 2011.[4] The actual completion time was late 2013, and the airport was opened on 26 January 2014.[1]

It was a notorious "ghost airport" around 2015; despite its size and cost, it handled just three to five flights per day.[5] By 2019, this number has been grown by more than 500% to reach more than 17 flights per day.

Facilities

The airport will have one runway that is 2,600 meters long and 45 meters wide (class 4C), and a 13,000 square meter terminal building. It is projected to handle 200,000 passengers and 900 tons of cargo annually by 2020.[1]

Airlines and destinations

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Archived copy" 1? (in Chinese). Huanghe News. 2014-01-26. Archived from the original on 2014-02-01. Retrieved .CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "VariFlight". www.variflight.com.
  3. ^ Airport information for Lüliang Airport at Transport Search website.
  4. ^ 7.64 Archived 2012-04-25 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Watts, Jonathan (25 February 2019). "Concrete: the most destructive material on Earth". The Guardian – via www.theguardian.com.
  6. ^ a b ""=="". Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "12?". Retrieved 2019.
  8. ^ a b "==?". Retrieved 2019.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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