Merya People
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Merya People
Meryans
Muromian-map.png
Total population
extinct, however some people have began to identify as Meryan again
Languages
Meryan+, Russian
Related ethnic groups
Finnic peoples, Mari people

The Meryans are an ancient tribe that lived in the Upper Volga region and eastern parts of Moscow. [1][2] The Meryans were possibly a closely related people to the Muroma people, Muroma has even been suggested to have been a dialect of Meryan.[3] Meryans assimilated to Russians around the 17th century.[4]

History

The Meryans were stated to have fought with the Bolghars in wars against Tatars.[3] Merya began to be assimilated by East Slavs when their territory became incorporated into Kievan Rus' in the 10th century.[5][6]

The Meryans mostly lived around many rivers, and many river hydronyms are still of Meryan origin.[7]

The Meryans were an important part of the development of the Russian nation, and a played a role in Novgorod.[8][page needed]

Neo-Meryan flag

Today

Some people from the former Meryan territory have recently began to identify themselves as "Meryan", which is inspired by genetic links to the Meryan people.[4][9][10][11]in 2010 a film was made about the Neo-Meryan people.[12] In Moscow there exists a "Meryan society", and Meryan festivals have been done in Moscow.[4]

Language

The Merya language is extinct, however based on toponyms, onomastics and words in Russian dialects some people have tried to reconstruct the Meryan language. The first reconstructions were done in 1985 by O. B. Tkachenko. The latest book about Merya reconstructions was published in 2019.[13][14]

References

  1. ^ ? // ? ?. ? ? ? 1917 ?: / ?. . ?. ?. ?. -- ?.: ? ? , 2000. -- ?. 3. ?--?. -- ?. 559--560.
  2. ^ ? ?. ?. ? // ? . -- 1996. -- No 1. -- ?. 3--23.
  3. ^ a b SOUTH-EASTERN CONTACT AREA OF FINNIC LANGUAGES IN THE LIGHT OF ONOMASTICS (helsinki.fi)
  4. ^ a b c Jukka, Mallinen. "UDMURTIAN VIHREÄT KUNNAAT" (PDF). Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  5. ^ Janse, Mark; Sijmen Tol; Vincent Hendriks (2000). Language Death and Language Maintenance. John Benjaminsf Publishing Company. p. A108. ISBN 978-90-272-4752-0.
  6. ^ Smolitskaya, G.P. (2002). Toponimicheskyi slovar' Tsentral'noy Rossii ? (in Russian). pp. 211-2017.
  7. ^ Ahlqvist, Arja (1998-01-01). "Merjalaiset - suurten järvien kansaa". Virittäjä (in Finnish). 102 (1): 24-24. ISSN 2242-8828.
  8. ^ Mark, Janse. Language Death and Language Maintenance.
  9. ^ " ". www.merja.org. Retrieved .
  10. ^ "? - ? - ? - ?". www.merjamaa.ru. Retrieved .
  11. ^ "? | , , ?, , ?" (in Russian). Retrieved .
  12. ^ "Hiljaiset sielut (16) | YLE Teema | yle.fi". vintti.yle.fi. Retrieved .
  13. ^ Rahkonen, Pauli (2013). "Suomen etymologisesti läpinäkymätöntä vesistönimistöä [Etymologically opaque hydronyms of Finland]". Virittäjä (1).
  14. ^ "Allikas? ?. ?., ?, Kiova 1985."

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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