Sabrina P. Ramet
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Sabrina P. Ramet
Sabrina Petra Ramet
Born (1949-06-26) June 26, 1949 (age 71)
London, England
CitizenshipAmerican since 1966
Alma materStanford University
University of Arkansas
UCLA PhD
Occupationprofessor of Eastern European studies, writer
Known forscholarship on the former Yugoslavia writing in English
Notable work
Whose Democracy? Nationalism, Religion, and the Doctrine of Collective Rights in Post-1989 Eastern Europe (1997)

Sabrina Petra Ramet (born June 26, 1949) is an American academic, educator, editor and journalist. She was born Pedro Ramet and changed gender in the 1980s, when she became Sabrina Petra Ramet. She specializes in Eastern European history and politics and is a Professor of Political Science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim.[1]

In 2008, the historian Dejan Djoki? referred to her as "undoubtedly the most prolific scholar of the former Yugoslavia writing in English".[2]

Personal life

Sabrina Ramet was born in London, and is of Austrian and Spanish descent. She moved to the United States at age 10.[3] She became a US citizen in 1966 at age 17, and served in the US Air Force from 1971 to 1975.[1] In December 1990, she started living as a woman and began using the name Sabrina.[] Ramet lived in England, Austria, Germany, Croatia, and Serbia before joining the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in 2001, when she settled in Norway. She continues to travel for her research in Eastern European history and politics, in Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia and Poland.[3]

Education

Ramet was educated at Stanford University, the University of Arkansas, and UCLA. She earned her PhD from UCLA in 1981.[1][3]

Career and major publications

In addition to the current position as professor of political science at Norwegian University of Science and Technology since 2001, Ramet is also a Senior Associate at the Centre for the Study of Civil War as well as a Research Associate at the Science and Research Centre in Koper, Slovenia. She has written more than 90 journal articles and contributed chapters to various scholarly collections. She is the author of 12 scholarly books and has been editor of 35 scholarly books.[3] She writes in her native English, but her books appear in Bulgarian, Danish, German, Italian, Japanese, Macedonian, Norwegian, Polish, Serbocroatian, Slovenian, and Spanish.[3] Her translation of Viktor Meier's book, Wie Jugoslawien verspielt wurde, was published by Routledge in July 1999 in English as Yugoslavia: A History of Its Demise.[1]

One of Ramet's early books, Whose Democracy? Nationalism, Religion, and the Doctrine of Collective Rights in Post-1989 Eastern Europe (1997), was reviewed in Terrorism and Political Violence.[4] Her 2006 book, The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005, was reviewed in The American Historical Review,[2] Foreign Affairs,[5] East European Politics and Societies[6] and The Journal of Modern History.[7] In 2008, historian Dejan Djokic called Ramet "undoubtedly the most prolific scholar of the former Yugoslavia writing in English".[2]

Debate

In 2007, Serbian sociologist, historian and writer, Aleksa ?ilas, sparked a debate between himself and two authors, Ramet and John R. Lampe, by publishing a critique of "the academic West" in general, and Ramet's Thinking About Yugoslavia and Lampe's Balkans into Southeastern Europe books in particular.

In response professors Lampe and Ramet published a rebuttal of ?ilas' critique in the same Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans publication, in which both authors addressed his claims, while Ramet disputed his characterizations.[8][9]

Memberships

Selected bibliography

  • Nationalism and Federalism in Yugoslavia, 1963-1983 (Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 1984)
  • Nationalism and Federalism in Yugoslavia, 1962-1991, 2nd ed. (Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 1992)
  • Cross and Commissar: The Politics of Religion in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union (Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 1987)
  • The Soviet-Syrian Relationship since 1955: A Troubled Alliance (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1990)
  • Social Currents in Eastern Europe: The Sources and Meaning of the Great Transformation (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1991); 2nd ed. 1995
  • Balkan Babel: Politics, Culture, and Religion in Yugoslavia (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1992)
  • Ramet, Sabrina P. (1994). "Primordial Ethnicity or Modern Nationalism: The Case of Yugoslavia's Muslims, Reconsidered". Muslim Communities Reemerge: Historical Perspectives on Nationality, Politics, and Opposition in the Former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. Durham and London: Duke University Press. pp. 111-138. ISBN 0822314908.
  • Balkan Babel: The Disintegration of Yugoslavia from the Death of Tito to Ethnic War, 2nd ed. (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1996)
  • Balkan Babel: The Disintegration of Yugoslavia from the Death of Tito to the War for Kosovo, 3rd ed. (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1999)
  • Balkan Babel: The Disintegration of Yugoslavia from the Death of Tito to the Fall of Milosevic, 4th ed. (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 2002): also published in Croatian and Macedonian translations
  • Whose Democracy? Nationalism, Religion, and the Doctrine of Collective Rights in Post-1989 Eastern Europe (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1997) -- named an Outstanding Academic Book for 1997 by Choice magazine
  • Nihil Obstat: Religion, Politics, and Social Change in East-Central Europe and Russia (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1998)
  • Ramet, Sabrina P. (2005). Thinking about Yugoslavia: Scholarly Debates about the Yugoslav Breakup and the Wars in Bosnia and Kosovo. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521616904.
  • The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918--2005 (Bloomington, Ind. & Washington D.C.: Indiana University Press & The Wilson Center Press, 2006): also published in Croatian and German translations
  • Rellgija i politika u vremenu promene: Katolicka i pravoslavne crkve u centralnoj i jugoistocnoj Evropi (Belgrade: Centar za zenske studije i istrazivanja roda, 2006)
  • The Liberal Project & the Transformation of Democracy: The Case of East Central Europe (College Station, Tex.: Texas A&M University Press, 2007)
  • Serbia, Croatia, and Slovenia at Peace and at War: Selected Writings, 1983--2007 (Berlin & Münster: Lit Verlag, 2008)
  • The Catholic Church in Polish History: From 966 to the present (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

References

  1. ^ a b c d Carter, Daniela. "Sabrina P. Ramet curriculum vitae". docplayer.net.
  2. ^ a b c Djoki?, Dejan (April 2008). "Sabrina P. Ramet: The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005". The American Historical Review. 113 (2): 609-610. doi:10.1086/ahr.113.2.609.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Sabrina Petra Ramet, Professor". Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Retrieved 2017.
  4. ^ Kürti, Reviewed by László (1 July 2006). "A Review of: "Whose Democracy? Nationalism, Religion, and the Doctrine of Collective Rights in Post-1989 Eastern Europe"". Terrorism and Political Violence. 18 (2): 359-360. doi:10.1080/09546550600663591. ISSN 0954-6553. S2CID 147652725.
  5. ^ Levgold, Robert (February 2007). "Review: The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005". Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 2017.
  6. ^ Lukic, R. (November 1, 2007). "Review of Ramet's The Three Yugoslavias: The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005 by Sabrina P. Ramet. Washington, DC, and Bloomington: Woodrow Wilson Center Press and Indiana University Press, 2006". East European Politics and Societies. 21 (4): 726-733. doi:10.1177/0888325407307283. S2CID 143720694.
  7. ^ Stokes, Gale (June 1, 2008). "Sabrina P. Ramet, The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005". The Journal of Modern History. 80 (2): 470-471. doi:10.1086/591598. ISSN 0022-2801.
  8. ^ Djilas, Aleksa (3 December 2007). "The academic West and the Balkan test" (PDF). Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans. 9 (3): 323-328. doi:10.1080/14613190701728320. S2CID 154936884.
  9. ^ Ramet, Sabrina P.; Lampe, John R. (1 April 2008). "Debates" (PDF). Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans. 10 (1): 115-120. doi:10.1080/14613190801923276. S2CID 216141613.
  10. ^ Member listing of DKNVS Group IV, sociology and political science, Dknvs.no, retrieved 2017-01-05.
  11. ^ Member listing of DNVA Group 7: social studies, Dnva.no, retrieved 2017-01-05.

External links

  • [dead link] Ramet bibliography. Booksamillion.com. Accessed March 8, 2016.

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