Saline, Michigan
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Saline, Michigan
Saline, Michigan
City of Saline
Downtown Saline along Michigan Avenue
Downtown Saline along Michigan Avenue
Official seal of Saline, Michigan
Location within Washtenaw County
Location within Washtenaw County
Saline is located in Michigan
Saline
Saline
Location within the state of Michigan
Saline is located in the United States
Saline
Saline
Location within the United States
Coordinates: 42°10?15?N 83°46?47?W / 42.17083°N 83.77972°W / 42.17083; -83.77972Coordinates: 42°10?15?N 83°46?47?W / 42.17083°N 83.77972°W / 42.17083; -83.77972
CountryUnited States
StateMichigan
CountyWashtenaw
Incorporated1966
Government
 o TypeCouncil-manager
 o MayorBrian Marl
 o ManagerColleen O'Toole
Area
 o Total4.41 sq mi (11.41 km2)
 o Land4.33 sq mi (11.23 km2)
 o Water0.07 sq mi (0.18 km2)
Elevation
820 ft (250 m)
Population
 o Total8,948
 o Density2,064.13/sq mi (796.91/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code(s)
48176
Area code(s)734
FIPS code26-71140[2]
GNIS feature ID0637119[3]
WebsiteOfficial website

Saline ( suh-LEEN) is a city in Washtenaw County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 8,948 at the 2020 census. The city borders Saline Township to the southwest, and the two are administered autonomously.

History

Before the 18th century, Native Americans traveled to what is now Saline to hunt wildlife and gather salt from the salt springs they found nearby. In the 18th century, French explorers canoed up to the area and also harvested the salt. They named the local river Saline ("salty"). Europeans settled the area in the 19th century, most of them from England and Germany. Together with Orange Risdon,[4] a government surveyor generally considered the city's founder, the residents named the town Saline, which was officially established in 1832. In 1870 railroad service, provided by the Detroit-Hillsdale-&-Indiana Railroad, first reached Saline.[5] In 1875 Salinians built one of the city's most famous landmarks, the Second-Empire frame, 2+12-story residential building, the Davenport House, a.k.a. Curtis Mansion. The town continued to grow, and in 1931 the Village of Saline became the City of Saline.[6] The Saline Fisheries Research Station was built on the site of a pioneer grist mill.[7] Saline has had its own newspaper since ca. 1874[8] but the Saline Reporter was shuttered by its owner, Digital First Media, in 2014. The Saline Post, an independent outlet, now serves the community.

The city is popular for its annual Celtic Festival, which attracts people from all over the U.S. and its sister cities Brecon, Wales, United Kingdom (established 1966) and Lindenberg, Germany (established 2003).

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has an area of 4.41 square miles (11.42 km2), of which 4.33 square miles (11.21 km2) is land and 0.08 square miles (0.21 km2) (1.81%) is water.[1]

The Saline River runs through the city.

Major highways

  • US 12 (East Michigan Avenue) runs briefly through the center of the city.

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[10] of 2010, there were 8,810 people, 3,699 households, and 2,336 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,068.1 inhabitants per square mile (798.5/km2). There were 3,923 housing units at an average density of 920.9 per square mile (355.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.6% White, 1.4% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.5% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.6% of the population.

There were 3,699 households, of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.8% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 3.00.

The median age in the city was 41.1. 24.5% of residents were under age 18; 7.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.2% were from 25 to 44; 29.6% were from 45 to 64; and 14.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.0% male and 53.0% female.

2000 census

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 8,034 people, 3,148 households, and 2,134 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,736.3 per square mile (670.0/km2). There were 3,213 housing units at an average density of 694.4 per square mile (267.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.69% White, 0.56% African American, 0.32% Native American, 1.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.73% of the population.

There were 3,048 households, out of which 38.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.2% were non-families. 27.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 persons and the average family size was 3.09 persons. In the city, the population was spread out, with 28.6% under age 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 32.6% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% 65 years old or older. The median age was 36. For every 100 females, there were 86.6 males. For every 100 females 18 and older, there were 81.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $59,382, and the median income for a family was $73,162. Males had a median income of $51,391 versus $32,254 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,208. About 3.0% of families and 4.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.

The Ann Arbor Railroad also operates as far as Maple Road in the north of the city, but this portion is only used as a siding for the Faurecia Plant and only freight service is offered.

Education

Saline Area Schools operates the public schools.

K-3 elementary schools operated by the district include Harvest, Woodland Meadows, and Pleasant Ridge. Heritage School (4-5), Saline Middle School, and Saline High School (in Pittsfield Charter Township) serve the city.

Notable people

Sister cities

Sister Cities sign, Michigan Ave.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2022.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  3. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Saline, Michigan
  4. ^ "Archived copy". salinehistory.org. Archived from the original on 26 May 2007. Retrieved 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ History of Saline. Dikeman, Agnes L. Saline Area Historical Society. http://salinehistory.org/index.php?section=history&content=index. Retrieved 14 Oct. 2009.
  6. ^ History of Saline. Dikeman, Agnes L. Saline Area Historical Society. http://salinehistory.org/index.php?section=history&content=index. Retrieved 18 April 2006.
  7. ^ "Saline Fisheries Research Station". Retrieved .
  8. ^ "Saline History". Retrieved .
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved 2015.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  11. ^ Sister Cities - City of Saline, Michigan

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Saline,_Michigan
 



 



 
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