Trondelag
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Trondelag
Trøndelag fylke
Trööndelagen fylhkentjïelte
Midt-Norge
Trøndelag within Norway
Trøndelag within Norway
Coordinates: 63°25?37?N 10°23?35?E / 63.42694°N 10.39306°E / 63.42694; 10.39306Coordinates: 63°25?37?N 10°23?35?E / 63.42694°N 10.39306°E / 63.42694; 10.39306
CountryNorway
CountyTrøndelag
RegionCentral Norway
County IDNO-50
Established1 Jan 2018
Administrative centresSteinkjer (county municipality, county governor)
Trondheim (county mayor)
Government
 o GovernorFrank Jenssen
  (2018–present)
 o County mayorTore O. Sandvik
  (Ap)
  (2018–present)
Area
 o Total42,201.59 km2 (16,294.12 sq mi)
 o Land39,493.28 km2 (15,248.44 sq mi)
 o Water2,708.31 km2 (1,045.68 sq mi)  6.4%
Area rank#3 in Norway
Population
(2021)[2]
 o Total471,124
 o Rank5
 o Density11/km2 (29/sq mi)
 o Change (10 years)
10.4%
Demonym(s)Trønder
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
UTC+02:00 (CEST)
Official language formNeutral
Websitewww.trondelagfylke.no
Data from Statistics Norway

Trøndelag (Urban East Norwegian: ['troe?ndl?:?])[3][4] (Southern Sami: Trööndelage) is a county in the central part of Norway. It was created in 1687, then named Trondhjem County (Norwegian: Trondhjems Amt); in 1804 the county was split into Nord-Trøndelag and Sør-Trøndelag by the King of Denmark-Norway, and the counties were reunited in 2018 after a vote of the two counties in 2016.[5][6]

The largest city in Trøndelag is the city of Trondheim. The administrative centre is Steinkjer, while Trondheim functions as the office of the county mayor.[7] Both cities serve the office of the county governor; however, Steinkjer houses the main functions.[8]

Trøndelag county and the neighbouring Møre og Romsdal county together form what is known as Central Norway. A person from Trøndelag is called a trønder. The dialect spoken in the area, trøndersk, is characterized by dropping out most vowel endings; see apocope.

Trøndelag is one of the most fertile regions of Norway, with large agricultural output. The majority of the production ends up in the Norwegian cooperative system for meat and milk, but farm produce is a steadily growing business.

Name

The Old Norse form of the name was Þr?ndal?g. The first element is the genitive plural of þr?ndr which means "person from Trøndelag", while the second is l?g (plural of lag which means "law; district/people with a common law" (compare Danelaw, Gulaþingsl?g and Njarðarl?g). A parallel name for the same district was Þróndheimr which means "the homeland (heim) of the þr?ndr".[9] Þróndheimr may be older since the first element has a stem form without umlaut.

History

People have lived in this region for thousands of years. In the early iron-age Trøndelag was divided into several petty kingdoms called fylki. The different fylki had a common law, and an early parliament or thing. It was called Frostating and was held at the Frosta-peninsula. By some this is regarded as the first real democracy.

In the time after Håkon Grjotgardsson (838-900), Trøndelag was ruled by the Jarl of Lade. Lade is located in the eastern part of Trondheim, bordering the Trondheimsfjord. The powerful Jarls of Lade continued to play a very significant political role in Norway up to 1030.

Religion in Trøndelag[10][11]
religion percent
Christianity
88.17%
Islam
0.75%
Buddhism
0.24%
Other
10.84%

Jarls of Lade (Ladejarl) were:

Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim

Trøndelag (together with parts of Møre og Romsdal) was briefly ceded in 1658 to Sweden in the Treaty of Roskilde and was ruled by king Charles X until it was returned to Denmark-Norway after the Treaty of Copenhagen in 1660. During that time, the Swedes conscripted 2,000 men in Trøndelag, forcing young boys down to 15 years of age to join the Swedish armies fighting against Poland and Brandenburg. Charles X feared the Trønders would rise against their Swedish occupiers, and thought it wise to keep a large part of the men away. Only about one third of the men ever returned to their homes; some of them were forced to settle in the then Swedish Duchy of Estonia, as the Swedes thought it would be easier to rule the Trønders there, utilising the ancient maxim of divide and rule.[12]

In the fall of 1718, during the Great Northern War, General Carl Gustaf Armfeldt was ordered by king Charles XII of Sweden to lead a Swedish army of 10,000 men into Trøndelag and take Trondheim. Because of his poor supply lines back to Sweden, Armfeldt's army had to live off the land, causing great suffering to the people of the region. Armfeldt's campaign failed: the defenders of Trondheim succeeded in repelling his siege. After Charles XII was killed in the siege of Fredriksten in Norway's southeast, Armfeldt was ordered back into Sweden. During the ensuing retreat, his 6,000 surviving threadbare and starving Caroleans were caught in a fierce blizzard. Thousands of Caroleans froze to death in the Norwegian mountains, and hundreds more were crippled for life.[13]

Traditional Trøndelag house

Government

The county is governed by the Trøndelag County Municipality. The town of Steinkjer is the seat of the county governor and county administration. Both the county governor and Trøndelag County Municipality, however, also have offices in Trondheim.

The county oversees the 41 upper secondary schools, including nine private schools. Six of the schools have more than 1000 students: four in Trondheim plus the Steinkjer Upper Secondary School and the Ole Vig Upper Secondary School in Stjørdalshalsen. The county has ten Folk high schools, with an eleventh folk high school being possibly being opened in Røros, with a possible start in 2019.[14]

Districts

The county is often sub-divided into several geographical regions:

Towns and cities

There are nine towns/cities in Trøndelag, plus the "mining town" of Røros.

Geography

Along the coast in the southwest are the largest islands in Norway south of the Arctic Circle, including Hitra and Frøya. The broad and long Trondheimsfjord is a main feature, and the lowland surrounding the fjord are among the most important agricultural areas in Norway. In the far south is the mountain ranges Dovrefjell and Trollheimen, and in the southeast is highlands and mountain plateaus, and this is where Røros is situated. The highest mountain is the 1,985-metre (6,512 ft) tall Storskrymten, which is located in the county border between Møre og Romsdal, Innlandet and Trøndelag. North of the Trondheimsfjord is the large Fosen peninsula, where Ørland is at its southwestern tip. Several valleys runs north or west to meet the fjord, with a river at its centre, such as Meldal, Gauldal, Stjørdal, Verdal. Further north is the long Namdalen with the largest river, Namsen, and Namsos is situated where the river meets the Namsen fjord. The rivers are among the best salmon rivers in Europe, especially Namsen, Gaula and Orkla. On the northwestern part of the region is the Vikna archipelago with almost 4,000 islands and islets.

There are many national parks in the region, including Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella National Park, Forollhogna National Park, Skarvan and Roltdalen National Park, Femundsmarka National Park and Børgefjell National Park.

Climate

Trøndelag is one of the regions in Norway with the largest climatic variation - from the oceanic climate with mild and wetter winters along the coast to the very cold winters in the southeast inland highlands, where Røros is the only place in southern and central Norway to have recorded -50 °C (-58 °F). The first overnight freeze (temperature below -0 °C (32 °F) in autumn on average is August 24th in Røros, October 9th at Trondheim Airport Værnes, and as late as November 20th at Sula in Frøya.[15] Most of the lowland areas near the fjords have a humid continental climate (or oceanic if -3C is used as winter threshold), while the most oceanic areas along the coast have a temperate oceanic climate with all monthly means above 0 °C (32 °F). The inland valleys, hills and highlands below the treeline have a boreal climate with cold winters and shorter summers, but still with potential for warm summer temperatures. Above the treeline is alpine tundra.

Climate data for Sula, Frøya 1991-2020 (5 m, extremes 1975-2020)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 10.3
(50.5)
9.2
(48.6)
12.6
(54.7)
19.3
(66.7)
22.3
(72.1)
27.7
(81.9)
28.3
(82.9)
26.3
(79.3)
22.7
(72.9)
18.8
(65.8)
14.6
(58.3)
11.1
(52.0)
28.3
(82.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) 3
(37)
2.5
(36.5)
3.3
(37.9)
5.4
(41.7)
8
(46)
10.7
(51.3)
13
(55)
13.7
(56.7)
11.8
(53.2)
8.2
(46.8)
5.5
(41.9)
3.8
(38.8)
7.4
(45.2)
Record low °C (°F) -12.3
(9.9)
-12.7
(9.1)
-8.1
(17.4)
-3.6
(25.5)
-0.3
(31.5)
2.7
(36.9)
5
(41)
7.1
(44.8)
2
(36)
-1.1
(30.0)
-7
(19)
-10.9
(12.4)
-12.7
(9.1)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 92
(3.6)
75
(3.0)
80
(3.1)
55
(2.2)
46
(1.8)
53
(2.1)
57
(2.2)
74
(2.9)
104
(4.1)
88
(3.5)
108
(4.3)
113
(4.4)
945
(37.2)
Source: Norwegian Meteorological Institute[16]


Climate data for Trondheim Airport Værnes/Stjørdal 1991-2020 (12 m, extremes 1946-2020, sunhrs 2016-2020 average Gløshaugen in Trondheim)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 13.7
(56.7)
13.8
(56.8)
15.7
(60.3)
23.3
(73.9)
27.9
(82.2)
34.3
(93.7)
33.5
(92.3)
31.3
(88.3)
27.9
(82.2)
22.1
(71.8)
16.1
(61.0)
13.1
(55.6)
34.3
(93.7)
Average high °C (°F) 1.9
(35.4)
2.0
(35.6)
4.6
(40.3)
9.3
(48.7)
13.8
(56.8)
17.1
(62.8)
19.9
(67.8)
19.1
(66.4)
15.0
(59.0)
9.3
(48.7)
4.8
(40.6)
2.2
(36.0)
9.9
(49.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) -1.1
(30.0)
-1.1
(30.0)
1
(34)
5.1
(41.2)
9.2
(48.6)
12.6
(54.7)
15.2
(59.4)
14.6
(58.3)
11
(52)
5.8
(42.4)
1.7
(35.1)
-0.7
(30.7)
6.1
(43.0)
Average low °C (°F) -4.1
(24.6)
-4.1
(24.6)
-2.2
(28.0)
1.4
(34.5)
5.3
(41.5)
8.9
(48.0)
11.4
(52.5)
11.0
(51.8)
7.8
(46.0)
2.9
(37.2)
-1.0
(30.2)
-4.1
(24.6)
2.8
(37.0)
Record low °C (°F) -25.6
(-14.1)
-25.5
(-13.9)
-23.0
(-9.4)
-13.9
(7.0)
-4.7
(23.5)
-0.2
(31.6)
2.3
(36.1)
-0.3
(31.5)
-4.9
(23.2)
-10.8
(12.6)
-19.0
(-2.2)
-23.5
(-10.3)
-25.6
(-14.1)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 64.6
(2.54)
63.9
(2.52)
61.3
(2.41)
42.9
(1.69)
52.7
(2.07)
76.1
(3.00)
74.4
(2.93)
82.8
(3.26)
88.9
(3.50)
77
(3.0)
64.4
(2.54)
75
(3.0)
824
(32.46)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 34 71 124 205 236 234 229 167 130 116 46 16 1,608
Source: Seklima [17]

Trøndelag

There are 38 municipalities in Trøndelag.[18]

Municipal
Number
Name Adm. Centre Location in
the county
Established Old Municipal No.
(before 2020)
Former County
5001 Trondheim komm.svg Trondheim Trondheim NO 5001 Trondheim.svg 1 Jan 1838 5001 Trondheim
5030 Klæbu
Trøndelag
5006 Steinkjer komm.svg Steinkjer Steinkjer NO 5006 Steinkjer.svg 23 Jan 1858 5006 Steinkjer
5039 Verran
5007 Namsos komm.svg Namsos Namsos 1 Jan 1846 5005 Namsos
5040 Namdalseid
5048 Fosnes
5014 Frøya komm.svg Frøya Sistranda NO 5014 Frøya.svg 1 Jan 1964 1620 Frøya Sør-Trøndelag
5020 Osen komm.svg Osen Steinsdalen NO 5020 Osen.svg 1 June 1892 1633 Osen
5021 Oppdal komm.svg Oppdal Oppdal NO 5021 Oppdal.svg 1 Jan 1838 1634 Oppdal
5022 Rennebu komm.svg Rennebu Berkåk NO 5022 Rennebu.svg 1 Jan 1839 1635 Rennebu
5025 Røros komm.svg Røros Røros NO 5025 Røros.svg 1 Jan 1838 1640 Røros
5026 Holtålen komm.svg Holtålen Renbygda NO 5026 Holtålen.svg 1 Jan 1838 1644 Holtålen
5027 Midtre Gauldal komm.svg Midtre Gauldal Støren NO 5027 Midtre Gauldal.svg 1 Jan 1964 1648 Midtre Gauldal
5028 Melhus komm.svg Melhus Melhus NO 5028 Melhus.svg 1 Jan 1838 1653 Melhus
5029 Skaun komm.svg Skaun Børsa NO 5029 Skaun.svg 1 Jan 1890 1657 Skaun
5031 Malvik komm.svg Malvik Hommelvik NO 5031 Malvik.svg 1 Jan 1891 1663 Malvik
5032 Selbu komm.svg Selbu Mebonden NO 5032 Selbu.svg 1 Jan 1838 1664 Selbu
5033 Tydal komm.svg Tydal Ås NO 5033 Tydal.svg 1 Jan 1901 1665 Tydal
5034 Meråker komm.svg Meråker Midtbygda NO 5034 Meråker.svg 1 Jan 1874 1711 Meråker Nord-Trøndelag
5035 Stjørdal komm.svg Stjørdal Stjørdalshalsen NO 5035 Stjørdal.svg 1 Jan 1902 1714 Stjørdal
5036 Frosta komm.svg Frosta Frosta NO 5036 Frosta.svg 1 Jan 1838 1717 Frosta
5037 Levanger komm.svg Levanger Levanger NO 5037 Levanger.svg 1 Jan 1838 1719 Levanger
5038 Verdal komm.svg Verdal Verdalsøra NO 5038 Verdal.svg 1 Jan 1838 1721 Verdal
5041 Snåsa komm.svg Snåsa Snåsa NO 5041 Snåsa.svg 1 Jan 1838 1736 Snåsa
5042 Lierne komm.svg Lierne Sandvika NO 5042 Lierne.svg 1 Jan 1964 1738 Lierne
5043 Røyrvik komm.svg Røyrvik Røyrvik NO 5043 Røyrvik.svg 1 July 1923 1739 Røyrvik
5044 Namsskogan komm.svg Namsskogan Namsskogan NO 5044 Namsskogan.svg 1 July 1923 1740 Namsskogan
5045 Grong komm.svg Grong Medjå NO 5045 Grong.svg 1 Jan 1838 1742 Grong
5046 Høylandet komm.svg Høylandet Høylandet NO 5046 Høylandet.svg 1 Jan 1901 1743 Høylandet
5047 Overhalla komm.svg Overhalla Ranemsletta NO 5047 Overhalla.svg 1 Jan 1838 1744 Overhalla
5049 Flatanger komm.svg Flatanger Lauvsnes NO 5049 Flatanger.svg 1 Jan 1871 1749 Flatanger
5052 Leka komm.svg Leka Leknes NO 5052 Leka.svg 1 Oct 1860 1755 Leka
5053 Inderøy komm.svg Inderøy Straumen NO 5053 Inderøy.svg 1 Jan 1838 1756 Inderøy
Mosvik
5054 Leksvik komm.svg Indre Fosen Årnset NO 5054 Indre Fosen.svg 1 Jan 2018 1624 Rissa Sør-Trøndelag
1718 Leksvik Nord-Trøndelag
5055 Coat of arms of NO 5055 Heim.svg Heim Kyrksæterøra NO 5055 Heim.svg 1 Jan 2020 1571 Halsa Møre og Romsdal
5011 Hemne
5012 Snillfjord (part)
Trøndelag
5056 Hitra komm.svg Hitra Fillan NO 5056 Hitra.svg 1 Jan 1838 5013 Hitra
5012 Snillfjord (part)
5057 Ørland komm.svg Ørland Botngård NO 5057 Ørland.svg 1 Jan 1838 5015 Ørland
5017 Bjugn
5058 Åfjord komm.svg Åfjord Årnes NO 5058 Åfjord.svg 1 Jan 1838 5018 Åfjord
5019 Roan
5059 Orkland komm.svg Orkland Orkanger NO 5059 Orkland.svg 1 Jan 2020 5012 Snillfjord (part)
5016 Agdenes
5023 Meldal
5024 Orkdal
5060 Nærøysund komm.svg Nærøysund Kolvereid
and Rørvik
NO 5060 Nærøysund.svg 1 Jan 2020 5050 Vikna
5051 Nærøy
5061 Rindal komm.svg Rindal Rindal NO 5061 Rindal.svg 1 Jan 1858 1567 Rindal Møre og Romsdal

Culture

Arts

The region's official theatre is the Trøndelag Teater in Trondheim.[19] At Stiklestad in Verdal, the historical play called The Saint Olav Drama has been played each year since 1954. It depicts the last days of Saint Olaf.

Jazz on a very high level is frequently heard in Trondheim, due to the high-level jazz education in Trondheim. Trondheim is also the national centre of rock music; the popular music museum Rockheim opened there in 2010. Trøndelag is also known for its local variety of rock music, often performed in local dialect, called "trønderrock".

Food and drink

The region is popularly known for its moonshine homebrew, called heimbrent or heimert. Although officially prohibited, the art of producing as pure home-made spirits as possible still has a strong following in parts of Trøndelag. Traditionally the spirit is served mixed with coffee to create a drink called karsk. The strength of the coffee varies, often on a regional basis. The mixing proportions also depends on the strength of the spirit with more coffee being used for spirit with higher alcohol content. In southern regions, people tend to use strong filter coffee, while in the north they typically serve karsk with as weak coffee as possible.

Grey Troender sheep. A breed which originated in Trøndelag.

The "official dish" of the region is sodd which is made from diced sheep or beef meat and meatballs in boiled stock. The Norwegian Grey Troender sheep is an endangered breed of domesticated sheep that originated from Trøndelag in the late 19th century. There are currently approximately 50 individual animals remaining and efforts are being made to revive the breed.

See also

References

  1. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  2. ^ a b Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  3. ^ Berulfsen, Bjarne (1969). Norsk Uttaleordbok (in Norwegian). Oslo: H. Aschehoug & Co (W Nygaard). p. 336.
  4. ^ Vanvik, Arne (1985). Norsk Uttaleordbok: A Norwegian pronouncing dictionary (in Norwegian and English). Oslo: Fonetisk institutt, Universitetet i Oslo. p. 311. ISBN 978-8299058414.
  5. ^ Hofstad, Sigrun (2016-04-27). "Her bankes det for et samlet Trøndelag". NRK (in Norwegian).
  6. ^ "Trøndelag fylke: English". Trøndelag fylke. Retrieved .
  7. ^ "Fakta om Trøndelag". www.trondelagfylke.no (in Norwegian Bokmål). Retrieved .
  8. ^ "Om oss". Trøndelag (in Norwegian Bokmål). Retrieved .
  9. ^ Sandnes, Jørn; Stemshaug, Ola (1980). Norsk stadnamnleksikon. pp. 322-323.
  10. ^ Statistics Norway - Church of Norway. Archived 2012-07-16 at archive.today
  11. ^ Statistics Norway - Members of religious and life stance communities outside the Church of Norway, by religion/life stance. County. 2006-2010
  12. ^ Gjerset, Knut (1915). History of the Norwegian People, Volumes II. The MacMillan Company. pp. 318-320.
  13. ^ "Historien" (in Norwegian). Retrieved .
  14. ^ Olsen Haugen, Morten, ed. (2018-03-10). "Trøndelag". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved .
  15. ^ https://www.yr.no/artikkel/forste-frostnatt-1.11261900
  16. ^ http://sharki.oslo.dnmi.no/portal/page?_pageid=73,39035,73_39080&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  17. ^ seklima.met.no
  18. ^ List of Norwegian municipality numbers
  19. ^ Haugan, Trond E (2008). Byens magiske rom: Historien om Trondheim kino. Tapir Akademisk Forlag. ISBN 9788251922425.)

External links


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Trondelag
 



 



 
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